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Private Healthcare

Private health care is provided by entities other than the government. These may include for-profit businesses, charitable and non-profit organizations, as well as individuals and families. The term is mainly used in countries which have publicly funded health care, such as Canada and the United Kingdom, to differentiate from systems where private healthcare is the norm, such as the United States of America.

There are ethical issues relating to private health care. The main argument is about the accessibility to health care based on the ability to afford it or not. Private health care can sometimes be more efficient than public health care. For example, private operators may be more innovative in areas such as telemedicine. Public health care tends to be limited by the amount of tax that individuals pay.

Private health care is financed by either out-of-pocket payments, which includes direct payment of costs by individuals and their families, or by private health insurance plans. This includes plans which individuals have purchased independently, as well as employer-based plans which individuals participate in through their workplaces.

Dealing with multiple illnesses in a family

Social Worker: case. You meet this family in the hospital setting as they are considering whether the patient will remain there for her final days or whether hospice and palliative care will be provided for her in her home. Son Sam, the alcoholic Daughter Lila, with diabetes Grandson Josh, starting to have drug problems

Ethics and the DNR

The patient has large necrotic sore on her back, is laying in bed. Some of the time the patient can follow and understand, and focus on someone talking to her, while responding yes or no by shaking her head. She is too weak to write and cannot hold a pen. She grimaces when she is moved and is in physical pain. The Rns are ha