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The Philosophy of Religion

25 Pages | 6,710 Words
Keila Carvalho, MA (#107851)

This book describes the four basic arguments for the existence of God; the Ontological, Cosmological, Teleological and Moral arguments for God s existence. This book will also offer an explanation of the Problem of Evil in dealing with questions of God s existence. Lastly, this eBook includes a discussion of the Faith versus Reason debate within the history of philosophy of religion. This book is ideal for students studying Philosophy of Religion or Theology.

An Introduction to The Philosophy of Religion

Philosophy, in general, is finding the meaning and truths about the world around us. Philosophy of Religion is the branch on the tree of philosophy that seeks to find the truth, meanings and concepts of the universe, and understand God and faith. Religions tend to make truth claims about God and the universe. Human reason draws out the logical conclusions; basic beliefs which are derived from the way we perceive the world, giving us a different faith orientation.

The domain of controversy within the field of Philosophy of Religion revolves around whether or not we can understand or explain the universe. Arguments for God s existence say that we cannot understand the universe without the postulation of the existence of a divine reality. In other words, we cannot even begin to understand the universe unless we first suppose that God does exist. Conversely, the arguments against the existence of God maintain that scientific evidence points away from the existence of a divine reality.

Faith tells us to believe that the concept that we have of God gives us explanations for His nature, why the things beyond our comprehension exist for us. Our reason forces to sometimes doubt this faith. As a result, an interplay between faith and reason brings about a debate within the field of Philosophy of Religion. By looking at these arguments for and against the existence of God, as well as the progression and development of thought within the faith versus reason debate, one can assess which side of the fence he or she stands.

About the Author

Keila Carvalho, MA

Active since Sep 2010

Keila Carvalho and her family live in Rhode Island and she is currently a stay-at-home mother to an active and curious little boy. She graduated with Bachelor's and Master's degrees from the University of Rhode Island. She studied Philosophy with a focus on epistemology and the philosophy of truth and knowledge as an undergraduate. As a Graduate Student, her focus was on 19th century political philosophy and its relation to the current political nature of society today. She plans to continue her philosophical endeavors by working for BrainMass and helping other students of philosophy and politics.

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