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Human Cloning & Organ Transplants

1. All technology and new procedures can be used for positive or negative means. Therefore why should government arbitrarily choose one type of technology to prohibit?
2. What are the tangible things that a society has to fear from cloning?
3. Currently women have the right to choose to terminate a life by having an abortion. Why then should the government choose to deny the scientific community the right to develop and improve life?
4. What if you and your spouse were infertile were unable to conceive even with current technology would you reject human cloning as an option for conception?
5. What if you and your spouse have suffered multiple spontaneous abortions and you both desperately want a family would you reject cloning as an option for conception?
6. What if you or your family member were in need of a transplant and the physician is explaining to you that once you complete the transplant you will need to take anti-rejection medications for life and the cost of these medications is large. Your resources are limited and you would not be able to pay for medications. Would you still reject a cloned organ which would remove the need for these medications?
7. You or a relative has just learned that you need an organ transplant and if not received in 6 months you may die. The waiting list for this via the national registry is 1 year at the minimum. Would you reject a cloned organ in these circumstances?

Solution Preview

Please see response attached, which is also presented below. I hope this helps and take care.

RESPONSE:

1. All technology and new procedures can be used for positive or negative means. Therefore why should government arbitrarily choose one type of technology to prohibit?

Whether we agree with President Bush or not, his argument has to do with the ethics of cloning human beings for the purpose of saving other people's lives. Clearly, it has to do with personal values. And, for those who argue that personal values have no place in decision-making, s/he is deceiving them selves. Because even those who disagree with the government prohibiting some technologies depend on values for their decision e.g., a person who values freedom and freedom from controls set by the government.

However, opponents of cloning would argue that the government has the right (and indeed an obligation) to control science, especially when it has to do with human life. Cloning organs are viewed somewhat differently than cloning a human being, but many argue that science should not tamper with human life and genetics. It is also believed to be in its infancy and therefore needs more research before it be approved.

2. What are the tangible things that a society has to fear from cloning?

According to Philipkoski (2004), in a scientific first, Korean researchers announced that they culled stem cells from a human clone. They did this not because they want to make carbon copies of people, but because they hope their research will lead to lifesaving therapies for maladies like Alzheimer's disease or spinal injuries. But when most people think of cloning, she reports, they often think of renegade scientists sneaking women away in the night to take their eggs and re-create someone's departed relative. Or they envision baby farms where ...

Solution Summary

By responding to the questions, this solution addresses aspects of human cloning and organ transplants, such as the publics fear of human cloning and others.

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