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Human and Animal Cloning

What are the risks and benefits of cloning?
What are some potential uses for cloning?
Could you envision using cloning technology in your own life? If so, how?
What are some of the ethical problems with cloning?
How do you feel about cloning animals? What about humans?
Should cloning be regulated? If so, by whom?

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Cloning is probably one of the most controversial topics in the biological world. It has been around for quite some time, but Dolly the sheep was the first successful product (or, as it turned out, not so successful). First off, it takes a ton of time, money, and effort. The success rate, as just indicated, it pathetic. The number of failures far outweighs the number of successes. This brings up one of the controversies. Should all this money but pumped into something that usually does not work? The process is fairly simple. All you need is a nucleus of an egg from one species and an egg from another. The problem is getting the nucleus to be accepted by the host.

Benefits and uses of cloning are more hypothetical at this point. One of the best avenues of research is cloning organs directly from the organism's own body. This eliminates the chance of rejection because the DNA would be a perfect match and the body would recognize the organ as its own. Think of all the smokers out there who would happily clone their lungs if they new they could keep smoking. Or the alcoholics who would keep drinking because they could just get a new, identical liver after they killed the one they previously had.

One of the fallacies of ...

Solution Summary

This response addresses the subject of human and animal cloning. It offers some opinions as to the ethical considerations of the process and describes some risks and benefits of the process.

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