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    a. Show that any rational number a/b , between 0 and 1, can be written as an Egyptian fraction.

    b. Can an irrational number between 0 and 1 ever be expressed as an Egyptian fraction? Why?

    *c.* Show that any positive rational number a/b can be written as an Egyptian fraction.

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 2, 2022, 12:02 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/math/consumer-mathematics/egyptian-fractions-426903

    SOLUTION This solution is FREE courtesy of BrainMass!

    a. Show that any rational number a⁄b, between 0 and 1, can be written as an Egyptian fraction.
    b. Can an irrational number between 0 and 1 ever be expressed as an Egyptian fraction? Why?
    c. Show that any positive rational number a⁄b can be written as an Egyptian fraction.

    Solution:
    a) Show that any rational number a⁄b, between 0 and 1, can be written as an Egyptian fraction.

    Proof: Let 0<a⁄b<1 be a rational number between 0 and 1. If a=1, we're done. If a≠1, let n_1 be the smallest integer such that
    n_1≥b/a "so that " 1/n_1 ≤a/b "and" 1/(n_1-1)>a/b
    Now set
    a_1/b_1 =a/b-1/n_1 =(an_1-b)/(bn_1 ), where a_1/b_1 "is in lowest terms."
    Now since 1⁄((n_1-1)>a⁄b,) we have
    b/(n_1-1)>a
    b>a(n_1-1)
    b>an_1-a
    a>an_1-b
    Thus we have
    a/b=1/n_1 +a_1/b_1 , "where" a_1<a.

    If a_1=1, we're done. If a_1≠1, we continue the process with a_1⁄b_1 to obtain

    a_1/b_1 =1/n_2 +a_2/b_2 , "where" a_2<a_1.
    Then we have
    a/b=1/n_1 +1/n_2 +a_2/b_2

    Since the numerator a_k of a_k⁄b_k is decreasing, the process will stop at some point when a_k=1 and n_k=b_k.
    Then we obtain
    a/b=1/n_1 +1/n_2 +⋯+1/n_(k-1) +1/n_k ,
    where n_1<n_2<⋯<n_(k-1)<n_k.
    Thus every rational number a⁄b between 0 and 1 can be written as an Egyptian fraction.

    b) Can an irrational number between 0 and 1 ever be expressed as an Egyptian fraction? Why?

    Solution: Since every Egyptian fraction is a sum of distinct unit fractions, it follows that every Egyptian fraction is a rational number, i.e. can be written in the form m⁄(n,) where m and n are integers. By definition, an irrational number cannot be written in the form m⁄(n,) where m and n are integers. So no irrational number between 0 and 1 can ever be expressed as an Egyptian fraction.

    c) Show that any positive rational number a⁄b can be written as an Egyptian fraction.

    Proof: We've shown that any rational number a⁄b, between 0 and 1 can be represented as an Egyptian fraction, i.e.

    a/b=1/n_1 +1/n_2 +⋯+1/n_k ,
    where n_1,n_2,...,n_k. Note that this representation is never unique. For example,
    1/n=1/(n+1)+1/(n(n+1))
    This gives us
    1=1/2+1/2=1/2+1/3+1/6
    1=1/3+1/6+1/4+1/12+1/7+1/42
    1=1/4+1/12+1/7+1/42+1/5+1/20+1/13+1/156+1/8+1/56+1/43+1/1806

    So we obtain two Egyptian fraction representations of 1
    1=1/2+1/3+1/6
    and
    1=1/4+1/12+1/7+1/42+1/5+1/20+1/13+1/156+1/8+1/56+1/43+1/1806
    that have no unit fractions in common.

    So by rewriting the terms as sums of unit fractions with larger denominators, we can obtain infinitely many Egyptian fraction representations of 1 that have no unit fractions in common.

    Then if a⁄b is a rational number greater than 1, we can write it as

    a/b=q+r/b, where q and r are integers and 0≤r/b<1.
    Thus we have
    a/b=⏟(1+1+⋯+1)┬(q times)+r/b.

    We've already shown that 1 and r⁄b can be expressed as Egyptian fractions and rewriting the unit fractions as sums of smaller unit fractions with larger denominators, we can write a/b as the sum of distinct unit fractions.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com October 2, 2022, 12:02 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/math/consumer-mathematics/egyptian-fractions-426903

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