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    Difference Between Web and Written Evaluation

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    How does evaluation of a healthcare website differ from evaluation of written material?
    How should an organization apply these criteria in developing its website?

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com March 4, 2021, 7:59 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/health-sciences/health-care-ethics/difference-web-written-evaluation-137135

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    EVALUATION OF RESOURCES

    In the research process you will encounter many types of resources including books, articles and websites. But not everything you find on your topic will be suitable. How do you make sense of what is out there and evaluate its authority and appropriateness for your research?

    SUITABILITY
    Scope. What is the breadth of the article, book, website or other material? Is is a general work that provides an overview of the topic or is it specifically focused on only one aspect of your topic. Does the breadth of the work match your own expectations? Does the resource cover the right time period that you are interested in?
    Audience. Who is the intended audience for this source? Is the material too technical or too clinical? Is it too elementary or basic? You are more likely to retrieve articles written for the appropriate audience if you start off in the right index. For instance, to find resources listing the latest statistics on heart disease you may want to avoid the Medline database which will bring up articles designed for praciticing clinicians rather than social science researchers.
    Timeliness. When was the source published? If it is a website, when was it last updated? Avoid using undated websites. Library catalogs and periodical indexes always indicate the publication date in the bibliograhic citation.
    AUTHORITY
    Who is the author? What are his or her academic credentials? What else has this author written? Sometimes information about the author is listed somewhere in the article. Other times, you may need to consult another resource to get background information on the author. Sometimes it helps to search the author's name in a general web search engine

    OTHER INDICATORS
    Documentation. A bibliography, along with footnotes, indicate that the author has consulted other sources and serves to authenticate the information that he or she is presenting. In websites, expect links or footnotes documenting sources, and referring to additional resources and other viewpoints.
    Objectivity. What point of view does the author represent? Is the article an editorial that is trying to argue a position? Is ...

    Solution Summary

    The differences between web and written evaluation is determined.

    $2.49

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