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This addresses the use of company email for union issues.

Should employees be allowed to use company e-mail systems to discuss common work related concerns pertaining to their wages, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment? How about to discuss unionizing?

Here are some ideas:

Yes I think they can discuss common work related concerns pertaining to their wages, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment with the caveat of only discussing it with the supervisor or someone that can directly affect the wages and the benefits. However, whatever is being discussed through email goes to the company's server where they can see what is being discussed. Anything that they send in the company's email system may be used against them if something comes up.

On the other hand, discussing about unionizing may not be appropriate because you are discussing some type of formation to bargain with the employer or company. Also it's not right because if you did sign a contract before working with the company, you agreed to their terms and agreement. If you did want to bargain with a group of people, it must be done outside of the company and not through their server.

Solution Preview

Yes, I think that employees should be allowed to discuss common work related concerns pertaining to their wages, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment, with the caveat of only discussing it with the supervisor or someone that can directly affect the wages and the benefits. However, whatever is being discussed through email goes to the company's server where they can see what is being discussed. Anything that they send in the company's email system may be used against them if an issue arises.

On the other hand, discussions about unionizing may not ...

Solution Summary

The solution provides a detailed discussion explaining if employees should be allowed to use company e-mail systems to discuss common work related concerns pertaining to their wages, benefits, and other terms and conditions of employment and how to discuss unionizing.

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