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Mislead or Deceive Consumers?

Food and drug manufacturers should be allowed to mislead consumers by using uncommon terms and descriptions to mislead or deceive consumers or should they be required to use "layman" terminology that almost all consumers can understand? Please support your answer.

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1. Should food and drug manufacturers be allowed to mislead consumers by using uncommon terms and descriptions to mislead or deceive consumers or should they be required to use "layman" terminology that almost all consumers can understand? Please support your answer.

There are two sides to this debate.

Some argue that the misleading of consumers is wrong and unethical, and should therefore be stopped. However, the Food regulators often defend the food and drug manufacturers arguing that that there is no intention to mislead consumers and those consumers can write for ingredients. However, other more obvious cases are against the law, such as substituting cheaper products for higher costing products, but labeling of the latter and higher prices are charged the consumer.

Which side do you lean towards? For those who think misleading consumers in any fashion is wrong, they argue it should be made against the law and better regulated. It is just as wrong as what is better regulated, such as economic adulteration of food, which is the practice involves using inferior, cheaper ingredients to cheat consumers and undercut the competition. The 1938 Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act specifically bans it, economic adulteration persists. It challanges the FDA's resourcefulness to remain vigilant against it. In fact, FDA has sought and won convictions against companies and individuals engaged in making and selling bogus orange juice, apple juice, maple syrup, honey, cream, olive oil, and seafood (see a broad ...

Solution Summary

This solution debates the following: Food and drug manufacturers should be allowed to mislead consumers by using uncommon terms and descriptions to mislead or deceive consumers or should they be required to use "layman" terminology that almost all consumers can understand?

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