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Turning Healthcare Policy into Legislation

J.W. Kingdon describes the agenda setting stage of policy formulation as a function of the confluence of three "streams" of activities: problems, possible solutions to the problems, and political circumstances (see Longest page 163). According to this metaphor, all three streams must be present for the policymaking process to move to the legislation development phase.

Based on information about President Clinton's Health Reform Proposal of 1993 (also known as "Hillary-Care), which did not pass the Congressional/Senate voting approval, and information regarding the Affordable Care Act (also known as "Obama-Care), which did pass and was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in the Summer of 2012, explain the similarities and differences between the 2 acts. Also explain why Clinton's reform proposal was not enacted into law.

Reference:

Longest, Beaufort B. Health Policymaking in the United States. 4th ed. Chicago: AUPHA Press, 2006.

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Based on information about President Clinton's Health Reform Proposal of 1993 (also known as "Hillary-Care), which did not pass the Congressional/Senate voting approval, and information regarding the Affordable Care Act (also known as "Obama-Care), which did pass and was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in the Summer of 2012, explain the similarities and differences between the 2 acts. Also explain why Clinton's reform proposal was not enacted into law.

Similarities in the two plans given by Obama and Clinton entail that both plans proposed mandatory coverage for Americans with Obama's plan using a "tax" for those who opt out of healthcare ...

Solution Summary

Differences and similarities between Clinton's and Obama's reform for health care legislation.

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