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Evolution and Creationism in Public Schools.

Describe the debate regarding evolution vs creationism in public schools.

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The First Amendment Implications of Teaching the Theory of Evolution and Creationism In Public Schools. By: Brownfield, Ellen Yonts. Journal of Law & Education. Jan 2007, Vol. 36 Issue 1, p141-148.
The battle between the use of evolution and creationist theory in the classroom is predicated upon First Amendment interpretations and whether the theoretical framework of creationism is predicated upon the religious paradigm that would negate it from being able to be used in classrooms. The basic premise of this argument is rooted in the debate of separation from church and state. This fundamental separation within the constitution of the United States posits that no church or religion should have the autonomy or selective capability to be used over any other religion. Therefore, any religion that attempts to foster an ideology about how humans were created is not able to be used in schools or official government policy.

The use of intelligent design as it is commonly known throughout the academic sphere is steeped in controversy because of its origins, which emanate from the bible. The bible promulgates that humans originated from a creator who was responsible for breathing life into all organisms and people. This concept is not a scientific theory because scientists have not been able to test their theoretical concepts. Those who don't believe wholeheartedly in "man's" science believe that this is a true theory and that science itself cannot fully explain the origins of human beings. This theory is deeply entrenched in the belief of faith and is based upon the notion that evolution has not been capable of proving that humans emanated from animals.

Prominent individuals such as the President of the United States George W. Bush have endorsed this theoretical framework during his tenure as president. This theoretical framework has also received endorsements from many different state officials. President Bush endorsed the teaching of this theory by the end of 2005 during his second term in office. Those who support this theory believe that two different theoretical frameworks must be present for students to ascertain how human life began.

Those who are opposed to creationism believe that it is only an extension of a religious doctrine that promulgates a religious ideology, which is banned by the United States constitution. Their beliefs are that the public school classroom must be free from all endorsement of ...

Solution Summary

The evolution and creationism in public schools are examined.