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Families in Transition

This job discusses the "mixed messages" that each of these children is receiving, as a result of unintentional socialization:

a. Katie's dad told her she must always eat in the kitchen table from now on, because they just had new carpeting installed. Later that day, Katie's dad was sitting on the couch eating pizza, while he watched TV.
b. Before leaving home, Molly's mother told her she could not have any gum or candy while at the grocery store that day. Later, when they got to the check-out, Molly asked her mother if she could have some M&M's. "Remember what I told you? No gum or candy," her mother said. Molly proceeded to stamp her feet and whine loudly. Through scrunched eyes, she watched her mother. After a few minutes, her mother said, "Oh, all right then. You can have one bag of M&M's, but that's it! Now stop your crying."

2. Our text explains how, as a result of societal changes, childhood is getting shorter and shorter. Please provide some examples of how we are seeing this happen. Use your own personal experiences.

Solution Preview

Hi there -
A sure-fire way of inviting problems into the parent-child relationship is to send mixed or unclear messages. Clear communication is an absolute must if a parent wants to have a bonding relationship with a child. It helps build a foundation of trust, fosters a healthy self-esteem, encourages positive behavior, and helps tone down frustration and stress in the family.
In the first scenario, Katie learns that she must only eat in the kitchen to avoid spilling food or drink on the new carpet. The same day, her father ate pizza in the room with the new carpet. This action could communicate a message to Katie that her father does not trust her to avoid spilling or that the new carpet is not that important and that she can disregard his previous message. 'Do as I say, not as I do' doesn't work. Modeling is the best way ...

Solution Summary

Families in Transition scenarios are uncovered.