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Epidemiological Transition and Population Profiles

The population profiles for developed and developing countries are fundamentally different. What are the differences?

Define the epidemiological transition and the fertility transition and relate them to the four phases of the demographic transition.

Different regions of the world are in different phases of the demographic transition. What are the consequences of remaining at earlier transition phases?

List four natural resources that are needed for survival. Next, list five things that might happen if the number of people in a family, village, country is increased but the quantity of resources remains constant.

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Hello,

You have asked for population profile differences between developed and developing countries, term definitions and how they relate to demographic transition, consequences of remaining at an early transition stage and consequences of not having enough survival resources to sustain a population.

A) Population profile differences:

Ninety-six percent of world population increase now occurs in the developing regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America, and this percentage will rise over the course of the next quarter century. Ninety percent of the world's births and 77 percent of its deaths will take place in LDCs in 1998. Ninety-nine percent of global natural increase -- the difference between numbers of births and deaths -- occurs in the developing world.

The Census Bureau's projections indicate that early in the next century, crude death rates will exceed crude birth rates for the world's more developed countries (MDCs), and the difference -- natural increase -- will be negative. At this point, international migration will become the critical variable determining whether the total population of today's MDCs increases or decreases. These projections show negative natural increase offset by net international immigration through 2019 but, if present trends continue, the population of the world's MDCs will slowly begin to decrease from the year 2020 onward.

As the growth rate in the world's more affluent nations becomes negative, all of the net annual gain in global population will, in effect, come from the world's developing countries.

Regional and global population change in the coming years will be determined by the interplay of a number of factors. These include:

? The size of the populations of the world's more affluent and less affluent regions and continuing differences in fertility and mortality exhibited by these populations;

? The uncertain future growth rates of several of the world's largest nations including, in particular, India;

? The extent to which couples will have access to reproductive health services, including family planning services, in those nations where fertility remains relatively high; and

? The ...

Solution Summary

This solution outlines the population profile differences between developed and developing countries, term definitions and how they relate to demographic transition. It also looks at the consequences of remaining at an early transition stage and consequences of not having enough survival resources to sustain a population.

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