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Critical elements of Total Quality Strategy and roles of Senior Management, Middle Management and Work Force in implementing it.

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Q.6 What are critical elements of Total Quality Strategy? What are roles of Senior Management, Middle Management and Work Force in implementing Total Quality Strategy?

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A total quality strategy has several critical elements
1. a customer-focused vision,
2. a concept of the voice of the customer,
3. a way of learning form outstanding companies,
4. an expression of caring for employees,
5. a means of removing the barriers to achieving quality, and
6. a measurement plan.

A total quality strategy does, however require significant changes in organization design, processes, and culture. More successful companies have developed their own unique approaches to fit their own requirements. Building and sustaining a TQ organization requires as readiness for change, the adoption of sound practices and implementation strategies, and an ...

Solution Summary

In the solution, the six critical elements of a total quality strategy are listed followed by a paragraph discussing the significant changes in organization design needed for implementation. The roles of senior management and middle management in the process are explained. Reference: Total Quality by Evans

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The change management process consists of a sequence of steps or activities that a change management team or project leader would follow in order to apply change management to a project or change implementation. Most change management processes contain the following three phases: Phase 1- preparing for change (preparation, assessment and strategy development), Phase 2- managing change (Detailed planning and change management implementation), and Phase 3- Reinforcing change (Data gathering, corrective action and recognition). Change management is a necessary component for any organizational performance improvement process to succeed, including programs like; Six Sigma, Business Process Reengineering, Total Quality Management, Organizational Development, Restructuring and continuous process improvement. Change management is about managing change to realize business results (Prosci, 2008).

The level of organizational development would identify patterns of change throughout the corporate infrastructure. New products or procedures may be relatively easy to develop and introduce, unless they are somehow in conflict with the organizations culture. When a major change program is implicitly at odds with the culture, it is often just absorbed and cancelled out. Before introducing change one should assess the readiness for change. Management should consider both personal circumstances and organizational context. If an individual is facing difficulties in his or her personal situation and works for a department that is held in low esteem, change will be seen as threatening and new ideas unwelcome (Dingfelder, 2007).

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