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Staffing Systems in Organizations

This solution is over 400 words in length. The actual textbook case study questions provided by the student were:
1. Should seniority be eliminated as an eligibility standard for bidding on jobs, meaning the two years plus employees would no longer have priority?
2. Should the job posting system simply be eliminated? If so, what should replace it?
3. Should a strict promotion from within policy be maintained? Why or why not?
4. How could career mobility paths be developed that would allow across-team movement without threatening team identity and cohesion?
5. If a new internal labor market system is to be put in place, how should it be communicated to employees?

Each of these questions is addressed in detail on how each staffing system item can be to the benefit, or detriment, of the organization.

Solution Preview

1. Seniority should not be eliminated as an eligibility standard in bidding for jobs; but it also should not have priority in determining which candidates are qualified. In the majority of jobs, 'time served' leads to a better understanding of how tasks are completed, often resulting in higher efficiency. For example, after a couple years, a 'bus boy' may be able to clear over 20 tables per hour - versus only 5 when hired. But not all jobs have the same exact required skill set. If a restaurant has a host/hostess position open, if seniority was the only requirement, a 'bus boy' or other kitchen staff may not be ...

Solution Summary

This solution is opinion based, over 400 words, and analyzes factors in staffing systems. It includes a discussion on whether longevity should be used for internal job bidding, rates how useful job posting systems actually are, and the potential pitfalls with a "promote from within" philosophy. The solution is five parts; utilizing actual workplace scenarios to support each of the points provided.

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