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Women in the Workforce & the Glass Ceiling

Women in the workforce

The issue of a "glass ceiling" is not new, but it doesn"t appear to have changed much in the last 5 decades since women started joining the workforce in larger numbers.

Why do you believe the glass ceiling continues to exist? Discuss several reasons.
Do you believe that an affirmative action plan based on gender (i.e., favoring women in hiring) is an ethical way to deal with the issue of the glass ceiling? Defend your answer.
What recommendations do you have to minimize the glass ceiling phenomenon? Be specific.

Solution Preview

The "glass ceiling" exists primarily because women have chosen to have careers yet still be part of having a husband, building a family, raising children. In large part it is self-imposed based upon women making choices. More women than even go to college, with women making up 58% of undergraduates (http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/09/education/09college.html). They then graduate, go on to careers. At some point, however, they often decide to have children. This often results in time off to raise the children. Meanwhile, the majority of men continue to work, in spite of marriage and children. In fact, as you know, most work to support the wives and children. Raising children and taking care of the home is a traditionally female position. In addition, women often desire to take on this role.

Another reason for the "glass ceiling" is that women are less apt to want to put in the commitment and hours necessary to reach the top. According to this link (http://www.martynemko.com/articles/real-reason-so-few-women-are-in-boardroom_id1225) only 38% of Harvard MBA female graduates work full time. Being a CEO or holding ...

Solution Summary

This detailed solution explores if and why the glass ceiling continues to exist for women in the workforce, and the reasons behind it. It also discusses if an affirmative action plan based on gender is an ethical way to deal with the issue of the glass ceiling, and gives specific recommendations to minimize the glass ceiling phenomenon. It includes links and examples.

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