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Ethical Decision Making Model

Using Rest's ethical decision-making model to address issues in school psychology such as cyber-bullying , and rumor spreading that destroys reputation and injures mental well-being.

Rest's Four-Component Ethical Decision Making Model

1. Sensitivity
a. Recognize the ethical issue(s) in a situation. (Who is at risk of harm or injustice? What are the risks?)

2. Judgment
a. Make an ethical judgment via reasoning. (If I logically apply principles, codes, and laws to the situation, which options would be most fair and just?)

3. Motivation
a. Establish ethical intent. (Am I resolved to place ethical concerns ahead of other concerns? What are my competing motivators? (e.g., duty, personal identity, professional identity, relationships)

4. Action
a. Act on the ethical concerns. (What is my plan of action to follow through on my intent?)

Solution Preview

A good model to meet school psychology industry's need. An ethical dilemma that would go well with this model is the case of cyber-bullying in the school.

For example: A group of students are gathered on the school playground, "texting" with their phones. A few of the girls are in your class. You have a good rapport with these girls and have a casual relationship with one of the parents of these girls. So you decide to saunter over just to say "HI " and visit with your students. They are laughing loudly and engrossed with their "texting", so they hardly notice your arrival. We you look over their shoulders to see what they are doing; you notice the screen and read the text on one of the girls phones. It is a derogatory and sexually inappropriate comment on Facebook about another student in the school. Once the girls see, they quickly tuck their phones away and turn to you and smile ...

Solution Summary

An ethical approach to cyber bullying.

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