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Evaluating a Program's Outcomes

Evaluating a program's outcomes is such an important step in the process. It is the culmination of the entire planning process and a time to reflect on your process and analyze the data you have collected. You will be reading a journal article related to a real life example of a behavior management program with real results.

Complete the following:

Share your analysis of the results of the program evaluated in this study. Was it successful? How do you know? Do the authors suggest changes based on the data?

See the following article:
Parsons, M. B., Rollyson, J. H., & Reid, D. H. (2004). Improving day‐treatment services for adults with severe disabilities: A norm‐referenced application of outcome management. Journal of applied behavior analysis, 37(3), 365-377.

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Share your analysis of the results of the program evaluated in this study. Was it successful? How do you know? Do the authors suggest changes based on the data?

Parsons, MB and JH Rollyson (2004) Improving Day-Treatment Services for Adults with Severe Disabilities: A Norm Referenced Application of Outcome Management. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis 37(3), 365-377

There are two variables, according to the authors, that serve to judge the nature of disability-centered programs. First, the availability of activities that promote learning and social skills. Second, whether these activities truly engage the clients. In other words, whether or not these activities truly promote social skills, learning or any other life enhancing feature through meaningful and purposeful participation. Of course, the study has a strong normative component, one that is appropriate and admitted on page 366. The whole point is to improve the quality of life of these disabled people, and secondarily, to make working with them easier, more interesting and more rewarding. The analysis of the students (of varying severity in mental retardation and physical handicap) was accomplished by trained special-ed teachers. Support staff from the group homes were also present, and several research assistants were also on hand.

They begin, rationally, by defining their variables. They are qualitative, but that does not mean they cannot be strictly defined. Success is considered to be the activities, offered regularly, that constantly engage the student in the task itself. This also involves regular and intensive staff-student interaction. They also added an a priori concept of what a desirable interactive and functional experience ...

Solution Summary

The expert evaluates a program's outcomes.

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