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Legal Incident Reporting Requirements

http://www.health.state.mn.us/patientsafety/ae/index.html
http://www.rules.utah.gov/publicat/code/r380/r380-200.htm

Part I:
Review the Utah and Minnesota Incident reporting mandates, at the website links above. I need help in addressing the following points:
1. Who must report incidents at the institution?
2. Discussing whether there is a difference in the types of incidents that must be reported and explaining those differences or similarities.
3. Who investigates the incidents at the hospital level?
4. Explaining any steps taken to protect incident reports and control who may obtain the information.
5. Explain if and how a root cause analysis is utilized.

Part II:
Discussing whether a voluntary or mandatory incident reporting effort is best. List the pros and cons of each kind of system.

Solution Preview

Part I:
1. Who must report incidents at the institution?
In Minnesota those required to report adverse/sentinel events occurring within the institutions include boards that regulate physicians, physician assistants, nurses, pharmacists, and podiatrists. Any events that come to the attention of mandatory reports must be reported to the Minnesota Department of Health (Minnesota Department of Health, 2000). In Utah, the facility must designate a facility lead for reporting purposes, to the Utah Department of Administrative Services (2013). The designated lead does not need to be the same individual for each sentinel event.

2. Discussing whether there is a difference in the types of incidents that must be reported and explaining those differences or similarities.
The majority of sentinel events listed are identical in Utah and Minnesota. In Utah, the types of incidents that must be reported are clearly defined. The list is extensive and includes medication errors of all types, all forms of surgical errors, death or injury caused by malfunction of products or equipment, suicides, death of a pregnant woman or woman who has recently given birth, unexpected death of an infant, death or injury due to therapy or radiation treatment, and all criminal acts. A facility must also report a suspected sentinel event of a patient transferred from another facility, where the event is suspected to have occurred at the other facility (UDAS, 2013).

The 28 reportable events in Minnesota are nearly identical to those in Utah, as they are based on JCAHO guidelines. However, patients suffering injury or death due to falls, not necessarily associated with improper use of or lack of use of restraints, is also required in ...

Solution Summary

The legal incident reporting requirements are examined. The differences in the types of incidents which must be reported and explained are investigated.

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