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Primary health prevention community nursing

Using immunizations as a primary prevention, how would one address this prevention in a community with less than desirable compliance? How would you justify this primary prevention as cost effective? Identify two measurable outcomes in defining the success of the plan.

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1. Using immunizations as a primary prevention, how would one address this prevention in a community with less than desirable compliance?

Primary prevention measures fall into two categories. The first category includes actions to protect against disease and disability, such as getting immunizations, ensuring the supply of safe drinking water, applying dental sealants to prevent tooth decay, and guarding against accidents. Examples of primary prevention of accidents include government and state requirements for workplace safety to prevent industrial injuries and equipping automobiles with air bags and anti-lock brakes.

Generally, community mobilization involves assessing the community to determine what is causing the non-compliance. Educating the community and listening to concerns with the hope that you can influence them to understand the importance of immunization. Knowledge and involvement often help to break resistance to programs and increase compliance. You could call a town hall meeting and present facts and examples of other success stories, as well as what occurs where there has been non-compliance to immunization for certain diseases. Immunization against smallpox is an example of the success possible through universal vaccination programs
(http://social.jrank.org/pages/326/Immunization-Immunization-Success.html#ixzz0JaPFbca9&D).

? For example, when about 90% of the population is vaccinated then there are not enough vulnerable hosts to spread an infection efficiently, so outbreaks are uncommon. This saves lives and costs associated with a disease outbreak.

? However, when vaccination rates drop significantly below 90% then herd immunity is lost and infectious diseases can spread, resulting in outbreaks.

? This is not mere theory - it happens. For example, in the UK fears that the MMR vaccine was linked to autism (even after the original research by Andrew Wakefield was exposed as wrong, subject to undisclosed conflicts of interest, and maybe even fraudulent, and later evidence confidently showed no link between MMR and autism), led to a precipitous drop in the rates of MMR compliance. The UK does not mandate vaccine for entry into public schools, so they lacked the buffer (for what it's worth) that exists in the US. As a result, there was, and continues to be, a resurgence of previously controlled diseases, like measles.

? The later scare that the mercury-based preservative thimerosal could be linked to autism has had a similar effect, and such fears rapidly spread to the US. This link too has been shown to be false, and in any case thimerosal ...

Solution Summary

Using immunizations as a primary prevention, thorugh discussion and illustrative example, this solution explains how one would address this prevention in a community with less than desirable compliance, including how a person would justify this primary prevention as cost effective. Finally, two measurable outcomes are discussed in defining the success of the plan. References and other links are provided.

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