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Conducting Successful Library and Internet Searches

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IHelp with a Student Survival Guide is given. It should touch upon these 5 areas: Conducting Successful Library and Internet Searches, Upholding Academic Honesty, Developing Effective Study Skills, Managing Time Wisely and setting and achieving goals. Use details to make your action plans realistic as possible. Possible sub topics are below:

Conducting Successful Library and Internet Searches
how and where to find academic resources online
evaluating the strength and bias of a source.

Upholding Academic Honesty
avoiding plagiarism
Correctly citing references

Developing Effective Study Skills
forming study skills for a distance learning environment

Managing Time Wisely
balancing time and juggling school work, family ect....

Setting and achieving goals
how to reach goals despite obstacles

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How and where to find academic resources online
Evaluating the strength and bias of a source.

The Internet provides access to a wealth of information on countless topics contributed by people throughout the world. On the Internet, a user has access to a wide variety of services: vast information sources, electronic mail, file transfer, interest group membership, interactive collaboration, multimedia displays, and more. The Internet consists primarily of a variety of access protocols. These include e-mail, FTP, HTTP, Telnet, and Usenet news. Many of these protocols feature programs that allow users to search for and retrieve material made available by the protocol.

The Internet is not a library in which all its available items are identified and can be retrieved by a single catalog. In fact, no one knows how many individual files reside on the Internet. The number runs into a few billion and is growing at a rapid pace.

The Internet is a self-publishing medium. This means that anyone with little or now technical skills and access to a host computer can publish on the Internet. It is important to remember this when you locate sites in the course of your research. Internet sites change over time according to the commitment and inclination of the creator. Some sites demonstrate an expert's knowledge, while others are amateur efforts. Some may be updated daily, while others may be outdated. As with any information resource, it is important to evaluate what you find on the Internet. For more information, see Evaluating Internet Resources.

Also be aware that the addresses of Internet sites frequently change. Web sites can disappear altogether. Do not expect stability on the Internet.

One of the most efficient ways of conducting research on the Internet is to use the World Wide Web. Since the Web includes most Internet protocols, it offers access to a great deal of what is available on the Internet.

There are a number of basic ways to access information on the Internet:
1. Go directly to a site if you have the address
2. Browse
3. Explore a subject directory
4. Conduct a search using a Web search engine
5. Query a service devoted to digitized scholarly materials or books
6. Explore the information stored in live databases on the Web, known as the "deep Web"
7. Join an e-mail discussion group or Usenet newsgroup
8. Subscribe to RSS feeds

Most of the criteria used to assess and evaluate traditional educational media such as textbooks and films can be directly applied to Web sites as well. These include: accuracy of the information, critical analysis of possible bias, credibility of the author and/or publishing source, appropriateness and accessibility (in terms of language) to the specified audience, timeliness, relevance to a particular subject area, validity of content, and effectiveness of aesthetic aspects.
Still, for a variety reasons, even deeper considerations for some traditional educational evaluation criteria, along with several new criteria, must be incorporated into current models to holistically evaluate products of this fairly new cyber-medium. For example, unlike traditional educational media such as films, textbooks, and journals - all of which are usually subject to a rigorous review process before being made widely available to teachers and students - virtually anybody with access to a Web server can create an educational Web site.
Generally, no entity comparable to a publishing company exists to help ensure the credibility or expertise of educational Web designers or authors. Likewise, no formal review board examines the validity of the information on most educational Web sites. So while it remains important for educators to constantly perform our own assessments of materials we use in our classrooms, this responsibility is intensified when it comes to Internet media.
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HR Management and Law: Parental discrimination cases. Importance of Lockwood case

For your first case assignment, you will be examining a relatively new discrimination topic in HRM. The topic is "family responsibilities discrimination." Please read the chicagotribune.com article, "Win in parental discrimination cases raises issues for employers" at
http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=1953105451&sid=1&Fmt=3&clientId=29440&RQT=309&VName=PQD

Also conduct an Internet search of government websites and a library search on the topic.

For your case assignment, after reading the above article and other information you have found, discuss the following:

What is the Lockwood case and why is it important?

Discuss how existing federal laws prohibiting job discrimination based on gender, pregnancy or disability can protect caregivers as well. Be specific.

Courts are increasingly becoming more family-friendly in their court case decisions. Please discuss.

What types of employer actions are needed to ensure that family responsibilities discrimination doesn't take place? Please give specific employer examples.

Assignment Expectations:

Your paper should demonstrate critical thinking and analysis of the relevant issues and HRM actions, drawing upon all of the required background readings and any relevant sources from your prior courses and your own library and Internet research.

Prepare a paper that is professionally presented (including a cover page, a "List of References," and a strong introduction and conclusion). Proofread your paper carefully for grammar, spelling and word-usage errors.

Address all aspects of the assignment as stated above.

Provide private-sector employer examples of HRM programs, systems, processes and/or procedures as you address the above assignment requirements. Provide the names of the employers. Note--do not use your SLP organization as an employer example in your case paper.

Limit your Internet searching and focus instead on library searches and be sure to bring in information from the background readings.

Give authors credit for their work. Cite sources of borrowed information in the body of your text as footnotes, numbered end notes or APA style of referencing.

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