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Literary Trauma

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With regard to any specific aspect of Akiko's experience at the Japanese "recreation center" camp, how would using that trauma as a literary subject put the memory of the event in danger of becoming normalized? Is the depiction of this event discrediting the experience? Is it memorializing the event or normalizing it? How would the understanding of these scenes in the novel change when looking at personal testimonies by survivors of the camps?

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Kindly rate 5/5 for my notes.

With regard to Akiko's experience at the Japanese "recreation center" camp, using the trauma as a literary subject puts the memory of the event in danger of becoming normalized, as it seems to mirror what other war, genocide, and Holocaust novels depict, thus making it more universal and common, not a unique experience of terror for these individual Korean female survivors. The scene where Akiko recalls, for example, "I heard men laughing and betting how many men one comfort woman could service before she split open ...

Solution Summary

Some credits deem texts such as Comfort Woman by Nora Okja Keller as ways in which literary trauma can discredit historical accounts of women's abuse and subjugation. This posting offers some personal, informal insight into this debate in 300 words.

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