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Do organizations need to have a mission statement? Explain

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1. Do organizations need to have a mission statement? Explain
2. Should your product and/or service strive to obtain zero defects?
Why or why not?
3. Define total quality management (TQM).
4. Include a description of the impact of globalization on quality.
5. Compare and contrast traditional management styles with quality focused management styles.
6. Please explain how TQM applies or should apply to organizations.

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1. Do organizations need to have a mission statement? Explain
Organizations need to have mission statement because goals and objectives are often summarized into a mission statement. A mission statement describes in graphic terms where you want to be in the future. It describes how you see events unfolding in 10 or 20 years if everything goes exactly as you hope. A mission statement is more immediate. It details what you will do today to attain your goal, purpose, or mission. Ford's brief but powerful slogan, "Quality is Job 1" is a mission statement. However most mission statements are more detailed often describing what will be done, by whom, for whom, and why. For example: "Our mission is to meet or exceed the demands of business computer users by offering a level of service that surpasses anything available in the Tritown area while providing our employees with a stimulating environment in which to grow and providing our shareholders with a return that is above the industry average."
An effective mission statement is:
· clear and unambiguous
· paints a vivid picture
· describes the future
· is memorable and engaging
· involves aspirations that are realistic
· is aligned with the organizations values and culture
· is driven by customer needs (if it is for a business organization)

2. Should your product and/or service strive to obtain zero defects?
Why or why not?
The Third Absolute of Quality (developed by Philip B. Crosby) states that the performance standard of quality is Zero Defects. Simply stated, no one should be satisfied until the work is done right the first time. The obligation of all employees is to understand and eliminate the root causes of customer dissatisfaction.
The 1994 standard required an organization to demonstrate that it had defined work processes, that its workers followed the processes, and that nonconforming products were identified and segregated. Remarkably, the 1994 standard did not specifically require that an organization take any action to improve the quality of its products and services. The 2000 standard requires that management use the information from the quality system to implement improvements. The standard specifically requires that improvement efforts include a quality policy, quality objectives, analysis of data, corrective and preventive actions, and a management review to assess their effectiveness.
In most cases, the biggest factor in a company's quality program is cost. To paraphrase early 20th-century U.S. President Calvin Coolidge, the chief business of business is business. In other words, successful quality programs must represent money to the for-profit companies that undertake them--money that they earn, or money that they save. The pursuit of zero defects is justified only if it satisfies this requirement, the most important metric of all.
Philip Crosby asserted that quality is free in his book of the same name, which brought the concept of zero defects into the mainstream. Most managers would agree with the corollary that poor quality costs a great deal. Inefficient manufacturing processes can lead to scrapped materials and necessitate time-consuming and expensive rework, but preventing this through inspection and corrective action is costly, as well. This was recognized at least as far back as the 1940s, when early quality guru Armand V. Feigenbaum began to express inefficient manufacturing processes in the form of dollars lost.
Crosby furthered this idea by pointing out that preventing defects in the planning stages of a process is the cheapest and surest way to ensure quality. Flawed proc-esses, designed by leaders who haven't fully worked out the ramifications of those flaws, are the ones most likely to lead to defective products and high inspection or rework costs. Managers set the tone for change within their working environments; workers on the shop floor follow the edicts set forth by their leadership. No amount of worker conscientiousness, professionalism, dedication or foresight can bring about a zero defects state in the absence of management's ...

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