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    Organizational Behavior - Communications Technology

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    Communications technology is exploding and the resultant impact on business can be quite significant. In more and more cases, face-to-face communication has been replaced by technology applications, some quite simple and some that have been around for many years.

    Your assignment is to identify as many business communications technology applications as possible. For each situation you identify, briefly describe the following:

    1. The business communications situation (including the business function being accomplished)
    2. The way communication occurred in the pre-technology setting
    3. The technology now being used
    4. Advantages and disadvantages to the technology-aided communication approach

    Technology application examples can range from situations as varied as using the telephone or walkie-talkie to talk to someone vs. talking in person to tweeting to advertise product enhancements.

    2,764 words

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    Solution Preview

    Identify as many business communications technology applications as possible. For each situation you identify, briefly describe the following:

    1. The business communications situation (including the business function being accomplished)
    2. The way communication occurred in the pre-technology setting
    3. The technology now being used
    4. Advantages and disadvantages to the technology-aided communication approach

    Technology application examples can range from situations as varied as using the telephone or walkie-talkie to talk to someone vs. talking in person to tweeting to advertise product enhancements.

    Nowhere has technological progress been as dramatic as in the field of information and communication technology (ICT). Citizens of the developed world now live in an environment in which access to electronic information and communication is nearly ubiquitous?and we rely heavily on being surrounded by this technology. In fact, it is so omnipresent that we only recognize our dependence on ICT when a network server or a communications system fails, leaving us cut off from cyberspace.
    The fields of biometrics and ICT aim to develop approaches that allow individuals to identify themselves and gain access to services without having to carry electronic gadgets or any physical means of identification, such as a credit card, driving license or identity card. Although such technology, which relies on either implanted microchips or sophisticated and ubiquitous identification techniques, could make life easier, it also holds enormous challenges in regard to privacy infringement. Assuming that the necessary technology is universally disseminated, anyone could be recognized and identified anywhere on the basis of their personal characteristics or traits.

    If a person leaves a physical space, for instance a park bench, it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to track this action afterwards?that is, to prove that the individual spent half an hour there enjoying the sun. In principle, leaving a physical place means leaving it forever; by contrast, being in cyberspace means being there forever, because all of an individual's actions are stored immediately, and can be tracked and analysed. Furnishing real space with ICT will change the way in which we act as, in principle, every action will be traceable indefinitely. The advantages provided by ICT could therefore be countermanded by the infringements on our privacy: "... location services will often become repositories of potentially sensitive personal and corporate information. Where you are and who you are with are closely correlated with what you are doing. To leave this information unprotected for everybody to see is clearly undesirable" .
    Instant messaging (IM) has become a popular way to communicate with clients and coworkers, and for good reason. Communicating over the Internet in real time can streamline communications and save you time and money. Plus, since most instant-messaging software is free, you don't need to invest more money in technology.

    But before you rush into using instant messaging, think about whether it will really improve your business communications or just serve as another distraction. First, consider reasons to use an instant messenger:
    Save on long distance. Using instant messaging to communicate with employees and clients in other parts of the world can reduce your long-distance phone bills. And most instant message services now also support voice conversations as well as video.

    Conduct real-time interaction. When you work on a project with coworkers who have busy schedules or work in different offices, instant messaging facilitates quick and simple communication. Unlike e-mail, when you use an instant messenger you don't have to wait for messages to download from a mail server.
    Reduce spam. Instant messengers get a lot fewer unwanted messages than e-mail.

    Host chats and conferences. Public chat rooms are often chaotic, and it's difficult to conduct a focused conversation -- especially for business purposes. Although instant messengers are most commonly used for two-way conversations, most programs offer a conference or chat setting where your workgroup can meet.
    Now that you've considered the advantages of instant messaging, take a look at the ...

    Solution Summary

    Business communication technology applications are identified in the solution. The advantages and disadvantages of these technologies are discussed.

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