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Management Training

Whether an individual is new to the world of leadership or an experienced leader, it is a fair assessment to assume that managers old and new must work towards perfecting and honing their skills through a management training program. In today's corporate world where the competition is razor sharp and an individual's ability to succeed in corporate America is predicated upon a managers performance, measure of productivity, competency and level of leadership skills. As changes occur, management repositions themselves in the marketplace in order to meet consumer demands, gradually adjusting to a rapidly changing industry. Change is defined as pervasive influence, where all aspects are subject to continual change of one form or another. Piderit, S.K. (2005) argues that, change is an inescapable part of both social and organizational life. The concept of organizational change is in regard to organizational-wide change, as opposed to smaller changes such as adding a new person, modifying a program, and the like. Examples of organization-wide change might include a change in mission, restructuring operations (e.g. restructuring of self-managed teams, layoffs, etc.), new technologies, mergers, major collaborations, and rightsizing.

"A Management Training Program must be designed around a clear understanding of the current and future needs of an organization (Barner, 2000). If people don't understand the problems that their company is likely to encounter as it shifts 30 percent of its market base overseas during the next five years, how can they anticipate the types of international leadership skills that will be needed to support that effort? If an HR executive with a public service agency isn't aware of the types of customer complaints driving the overhaul of the service delivery process, how can he or she determine whether the needed leadership skills are in place to tackle that challenge?" (Barner, 2000).

I find that, "people" often resist change instead of working with the changes being made. For this reason, integrating a management training program will train new managers to manage change resistance and to lead employees in the right direction. Fogler and Skarlicki (1995) investigated resistance to change as a response to the treatment employees receive in the change process. Specifically they focus on resentment-based resistance-reactions by disgruntled employees regarding the perceived unfairness of the change or the unfair advantages of the managers proposing the change. It is my belief that "people" should embrace change in order to survive the competition. The process of change is simply moving from the current way of doing things to an innovative and more effective way of doing things. Bridges (1971) believes that it is not the actual change that individuals resist, but rather the transition that must be made to accommodate the change.
A manager should embody various styles of leadership such as: transactional, charismatic, and transformational, this enables a true leader to change the direction of a company while motivating and encouraging new concepts, ideas, and feedback. Considering the 5-step development and training process, I have taken into account the importance of a needs assessment while formulating an effective plan. My management training program would translate into a Leadership Proficiency Training program. This program may be used as guidance, encouragement, and supervise performance of the Leadership Proficiency Training; (1) Identify internal and external factors within the organizational infrastructure.
(2) Assess submission through intermittent responsibility evaluations and assessments (Arvonen, 2002). (3) Discover and distribute innovative facts, expertise and high-ranking performances for evaluations, gap analysis, and gap resolution of leadership proficiencies; (4) Incorporate the evaluations and gap breakdown of leadership proficiencies into valid instruction and growth learning experiences; and (5) Present employee leadership proficiency information for external organizations. Evaluate current practices and systems to assess areas, which need growth and revisions.

Solution Preview

Whether an individual is new to the world of leadership or an experienced leader, it is a fair assessment to assume that managers old and new must work towards perfecting and honing their skills through a management training program. In today's corporate world where the competition is razor sharp and an individual's ability to succeed in corporate America is predicated upon a managers performance, measure of productivity, competency and level of leadership skills. As changes occur, management repositions themselves in the marketplace in order to meet consumer demands, gradually adjusting to a rapidly changing industry. Change is defined as pervasive influence, where all aspects are subject to continual change of one form or another. Piderit, S.K. (2005) argues that, change is an inescapable part of both social and organizational life. The concept of organizational change is in regard to organizational-wide change, as opposed to smaller changes such as adding a new person, modifying a program, and the like. Examples of organization-wide change might include a change in mission, restructuring operations (e.g. restructuring of self-managed teams, layoffs, etc.), new technologies, mergers, major collaborations, and rightsizing.

"A Management Training Program must be designed around a clear understanding of the current and future needs of an organization (Barner, 2000). If people ...

Solution Summary

Whether an individual is new to the world of leadership or an experienced leader, it is a fair assessment to assume that managers old and new must work towards perfecting and honing their skills through a management training program. In today's corporate world where the competition is razor sharp and an individual's ability to succeed in corporate America is predicated upon a managers performance, measure of productivity, competency and level of leadership skills. As changes occur, management repositions themselves in the marketplace in order to meet consumer demands, gradually adjusting to a rapidly changing industry. Change is defined as pervasive influence, where all aspects are subject to continual change of one form or another. Piderit, S.K. (2005) argues that, change is an inescapable part of both social and organizational life. The concept of organizational change is in regard to organizational-wide change, as opposed to smaller changes such as adding a new person, modifying a program, and the like. Examples of organization-wide change might include a change in mission, restructuring operations (e.g. restructuring of self-managed teams, layoffs, etc.), new technologies, mergers, major collaborations, and rightsizing.

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