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Human Resource Management and Testing

The company you work for is considering changing its applicant testing process. Your supervisor has asked you to address the following in a document that will be sent to other managers within the organization.

Write a short essay discussing some of the legal and ethical considerations in testing. Given these considerations, which testing system do you believe may be the most legitimate?

Remember to compare and contrast testing methods specifically to demonstrate how the methodologies you have not selected may have more negative ethical and legal consequences than the one you have selected. In your answer also discuss ways in which advancements in technology have helped to make the applicant testing and selection process more efficient and effective.

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Please refer to file attached, which is also presented below. I hope this helps and take care.

Interesting topic! Let's look at some of the research in this area, which you can draw on for your final copy. I also provided links for further research and considerations.

1. Write a short essay discussing some of the legal and ethical considerations in testing. Given these considerations, which testing system do you believe may be the most legitimate? Remember to compare and contrast testing methods specifically to demonstrate how the methodologies you have not selected may have more negative ethical and legal consequences than the one you have selected. In your answer also discuss ways in which advancements in technology have helped to make the applicant testing and selection process more efficient and effective.

Tests and assessments in the USA have taken on additional burdens as their uses have been greatly expanded by educators, employers, and policy makers. Increased demands are often placed on the same assessment, by different constituencies, to serve varied purposes (e.g., instructional reform, student accountability, quality of teaching and instruction). Such trends have raised considerable concerns about the appropriate use of tests and test data and testing is under increased scrutiny in education, employment and health care. This paper distinguishes among the legal, ethical and professional issues recently emerging from the increased demands of assessments and also identifies unique issues emanating from computer-based modes of test delivery and interpretation. (http://www.hhpub.com/journals/ejpa/19971302.html#19971302_8).

In fact, in today's competitive recruiting environment, companies are constantly faced with finding better ways to screen candidates for open positions. Managers and human resource departments in all hospitals are challenged with finding strong tools for screening applicants. Some other industries have had great success with this practice. For example, the U.S. Postal Service routinely administers tests to screen for qualified candidates. Additionally, government depots and prisons have also used this technique for many years with much success. Although these employers have had success with testing candidates for pre-employment screening, not all industries have had these positive experiences. In fact, many corporations have found that there are many legal and ethical considerations in testing.

Legal and Ethical Considerations

One legal concern that every employer is faced with is the challenge to compose a valid test that does not discriminate. Another legal concern facing employers utilizing tests is to maintain the privacy of test-takers and to obtain their consent for any applications that the results may be used for. These examples are legal concerns that tend to protect the applicant. There are additional legal considerations that affect the employers and for these reasons, they will and should continue to scrutinize applicants. For example, most acute care facilities require all nurses to take a written medication exam; all new employees must take a drug test. These tests are in place to maintain a drug free work environment and to assure the employer that the nurse has a required level of competency.

One ethical concern is that tests may reveal information that could bias a decision based on information that otherwise would not have been revealed. For example, if questions and answers revealed that applicants did not believe in blood transfusions for religious reasons, this information could easily be interpreted as identifying applicants that are Jehovah's Witnesses. This information could have the potential to sway a decision. Another example of ethical concerns with testing is the administration of tests without knowing the individual circumstances of each candidate. For instance, if one applicant is not able to read quickly but has terrific retention and ambition, this applicant may score poorly on the exam but then excel in the position.

Managers have an ethical obligation to each candidate to determine if the test is an appropriate screening mechanism.
There are many other tools available to a management team when faced with screening applicants. Each tool has its own strengths and weaknesses. A combination of tools will reveal the best information available. When management is screening applicants, they may consider the following selection techniques:

· Reference checks?this would provide necessary background information to determine the ...

Solution Summary

This solution explains some of the legal and ethical considerations in testing, comparing and contrasting to demonstrate the ethical and legal consequences of these methodologies.

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