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Planning for Organizational Change

I need some help writing notes for a powerpoint on changing a health care organization to an electronic system. In this part, I am just describing possible organizational and individual barriers to change. Attached are the barriers I found for this part. Would you be interested in helping me with the notes? I am doing two or three slides for this part so only need the notes enough for this part. One part is organizational barriers and the other part is individual barriers.

Organizational Barriers to Change
-Undefined goals and objectives
-Financial and environmental
-Lack of resource or bad resource allocation
-Structural
-Communication or lack thereof
-Poor leadership
-Lack of preparation for new roles
-Inadequate planning for requirements
-Cultural issues

Individual Barriers
-Fear of change
-Fear of the unknown
-Economic factors
-Misunderstanding
-Habit

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Organizational Barriers to Change

-Undefined goals and objectives
Unclear procedures and expectations are primary barriers to organizational change. It is crucial and always a good rule of thumb for management to: define, clarify, outline and specify with regards to goals, expectations, and outcomes in non-ambiguous ways. Also, the procedures and processes to facilitate such changes should be defined, as well as documented, for future reference. Unclear processes and procedures are also one of the primary barriers to change.

-Financial and environmental
If there are any deficiencies or lack of working capital in an organization, it will be impossible for changes to be implemented successfully, and for the organization to stay ahead of competitors. A lack of finance could arise from, but not limited to: a fall in market demand, increased competition, turbulence in the market place, such as what occurred on 9/11, and the domino effect from the dive that the market took worldwide.

-Lack of resource or bad resource allocation
It is imperative that management make good and educated decisions in allocating resources-including, but not limited to: money, time, machinery, and staff. Managers should avoid conflict situations that facilitate such effects.

-Structural
Traditional "cookie-cutter" organizations that are modeled after hierarchical structures tend to resist change more than their opposite counterparts in business; these are more of a "flat structure." In addition, the communication patterns between top management and the various departments in the traditional hierarchical structures are usually poor to non-existent. This causes a major rift in business and between management, departments and employees, and has an overall "trickle effect."

-Lack of Communication
It is critical that management communicate all its change plans with the employees. If employees are left to feel they are not informed about such plans; they will be more inclined to oppose; boycott; or "rebel" against such changes. As such, a well-defined change management plan-should include clear communication between management and employees.

-Poor leadership
Poor, ineffective leaders tend to do very little to motivate and inspire their employees to excel and push forward. Individuals need to be shown the way, and expect this from their supervisors and managers. Effective leadership strategies are paramount in guiding the entire change processes successfully and effectively. The only way to guarantee successful changes is if there is a good and effective leadership that is responsible for managing and implementing change plans.

-Lack of preparation for new roles
Many organizations, from time to time, will lack the key aspects of the planning phase. This failure to prepare, specify, and define new roles in the future when the changes are implemented are more likely to involve major resistance from employees. ...

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The expert examines the planning for organizational change.

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