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Facing Obstacles of Change in the Workplace

Question:
1-Discuss the imperatives for managing change in the workplace. (Give the continuing and complex realities of change.)
A-Discussion: What is the relationship (if any) between the concepts of "change"and "innovation"?
2-Describe how models can be used to plan and implement sustainable change initiatives. (Give the complex nature of organizations )
A: Discussion: Can an over emphasis on innovation lead to unethical behavior? For example, with a company like Enron, did the quest for innovation lead to the eventual downfall on the organization?

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Question:
1-Discuss the imperatives for managing change in the workplace. (Give the continuing and complex realities of change.)
A-Discussion: What is the relationship (if any) between the concepts of "change" and "innovation"?

The first problem that appears when systems attempt to make change is that people are reluctant both to change and to trying new things. "We have always done it this way," is one of the most well-know statements when a suggestion is made to do something differently. Steve Benson (2002) in his article, "But we have always done it this way" (Benson, 2002) tells the story of Czar Alexander II asking why a guard was placed in the middle of the lawn. Upon investigation it was found that in the spring of 1780, Catherine the Great, upon seeing the first daffodil of spring on that lawn, had ordered a sentry be placed at that spot, and for 80 years from that day, a sentry was assigned to the middle of the lawn. (Benson, 2002) Fiction or not, it is an example of something that continues for years for which there is no explanation.
Change can be minor or sweeping and can be the result of internal problems, reform movements, or social changes that "force the organization to adapt to the external forces" (Schein, 2004; Stojkovic, Kalinich, & Klofas, 2008), and Henry (2007) credits some to a "perceived loss of status" (Henry, 2007; Stojkovic et al, 2008). It is apparent when a system is not accomplishing its goals the likelihood that change and even experimentation is needed.
Before any change is contemplated those in power must determine if there is a real need and that officials have perceived a "performance gap" (Stojkovic et al, 2008). New personnel may establish different goals, missions, values and/or ethics. These are "primary forces for internal change as well as conflict" (Steers, 1977; Stojkovic, et al, 2008). Change can ...

Solution Summary

When there is a performance gap in the workplace it becomes obvious that there must be change of some kind. There are often many obstacles to overcome when attempting to make changes. We have all heard the phrase, "We've always done it this way," and there are those who feel threatened when changes are being made, whether because of internal pressures or external pressures. Changes can be minor or sweeping, but whichever is the case a change in personnel may establish different goals, missions, values and/or ethics. Change can be an obstacle or it can be a bridge that enjoins a system with its environment. Provided is a look at Kotter (1996), who suggests an eight-step process for planned change, along with Bolman and Deal (2003) who suggest four frames of organizations.

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