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Manager's Misconceptions About Training

I recently read a white paper by a company called Future Think on The Future of Learning and Development. They surveyed leaders (VP, Directors, Manager, CLO, CEO) in several industries including technology, healthcare, retail, financial services, government, non-profit, and automobile. They found that 62% of the leaders perceived training as standard practice (status quo). Another 19% saw it as a "must do" (required). Only 19% saw it as a benefit. This aligns with Noe's table on p. 542 where he discusses misconceptions that managers have about training. These misconceptions include: 1) Training is not valuable. It doesn't teach information that help managers drive the business. It is not strategic. It is an expense -- not an investment. 2) Anyone can be a trainer. Give me some PowerPoints and I'm ready to go. Anyone can get up there and talk for an hour or two. 3) Training is boring and not timely. Most of it is a lot of fluff. But the bagels and donuts are good. 4) Training is the responsibility of trainers or HR. 5) Training is a class. If I have a problem, I just call training and they will run a couple of classes to fix them. After my people attend the training class, everything will be better.

During the semester we have looked at number of concepts that address these misconceptions including ADDIE, learning strategy, transfer of learning, adult learning, career management, marketing training etc. in our readings and discussion posts.

Write an essay that addresses each of these misconceptions. I would like you to take each of these misconceptions and briefly tell me why you think that they might believe this and how you would clear up this misconception. (I am more concerned that your answer focuses on how you would clear up or change the misconception.)

934 words

Solution Preview

I cannot write an essay for you, but I can address these misconceptions and you can then use your posts and information from class as required to finish it.

1) Training is not valuable. It doesn't teach information that help managers drive the business. It is not strategic. It is an expense -- not an investment.
Training is a valuable tool for companies because it is adaptable and necessary for keeping employees up to date on the newest technologies, changes the company wants to make and helps build skills the company needs or anticipates needing. Offering training also helps companies keep the best employees because as a benefit, employees embrace training as a perk of the job.
The information taught in trainings can be as diverse as learning new computer software to how to talk to new employees from different cultural backgrounds. Training for conflict resolution for managers is a must to keep productivity high and worker and other conflict from taking away from the company's ability to be successful. Skill building is essential and most companies will be more efficient if they train employees in both job related skills and soft skills.
2) Anyone can be a trainer. Give me some PowerPoints and I'm ready to go. Anyone can get up there and talk for an hour or two.
While most people can learn to run a PP, not all people can train. There is significant information to retain, ...

Solution Summary

Manager's misconceptions about training is examined.

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