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This addresses training & development misconceptions.

Address the misconceptions in the following assertions:

1) Training is not valuable. It doesn't teach information that help managers drive the business.  It is an expense - not an investment.
2) Anyone can be a trainer. Give me some PowerPoints and I'm ready to go. Anyone can get up there and talk for an hour or two.
3) Training is boring and not timely. Most of it is a lot of fluff. But the bagels and donuts are good.
4) Training is the responsibility of trainers or HR.
5) If I have a problem with my employees, I will just call training and they will run a class to 'fix them.' After my people attend the training class, everything will be better.

Additional Question: Using a change management strategy, how would you implement a succession planning training program in a company with a corporate culture that does not value training and development. Imagine that this is being delivered to an executive in your organization and you are giving me an overview of the program and your implementation strategy.

Solution Preview

1) Training is not valuable. It doesn't teach information that help managers drive the business. It is an expense - not an investment.

Managers likely believe this because they see that in many cases, training does prove to be inefficient for the majority of the employees. When management analyzes the benefits of training, the costs seem to easily outweigh the benefits. Most often, this misconception is the belief of management because many companies often go with the lowest alternatives for training, and the results are then mediocre at best, because the quality of the training was not what it should have been. If the training is really quality training, this can still be justified as a misconception. Training is an investment on every level, because it is adding skills to the current workforce, whether it's in management or general employees. Many training sessions have led one employee out of the entire staff that was trained to propose an idea based on innovation that was a direct result of that training. That one great idea can easily lead to improvements in quality and processes that were not previously thought of, that end up saving the company time and money, and making the company more profitable. Training is always the superior idea to not training. The key is to train smarter, not more.

2) Anyone can be a trainer. Give me some PowerPoints and I'm ready to go. Anyone can get up there and talk for an hour or two.

Managers believe this because most managers (and probably all) have personally attended training sessions where it was evident that the person training was really just there talking, and not training. In many cases, the attendees know more than the trainer because many trainers are really not experienced or educated enough to be trainers. Many trainers are trainers solely because they can ...

Solution Summary

The solution provides a very detailed discussion with references examining the following assertions:

1) Training is not valuable. It doesn't teach information that help managers drive the business. It is an expense - not an investment.
2) Anyone can be a trainer. Give me some PowerPoints and I'm ready to go. Anyone can get up there and talk for an hour or two.
3) Training is boring and not timely. Most of it is a lot of fluff. But the bagels and donuts are good.
4) Training is the responsibility of trainers or HR.
5) If I have a problem with my employees, I will just call training and they will run a class to 'fix them.' After my people attend the training class, everything will be better.

Additional Question: Using a change management strategy, how would you implement a succession planning training program in a company with a corporate culture that does not value training and development. Imagine that this is being delivered to an executive in your organization and you are giving me an overview of the program and your implementation strategy.

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