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Artful Negotiation

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Review the Learning Exercise: Unhappy Co-Owners and address the following:

a. Assuming your Best Alternative to a Negotiating Agreement (BATNA) is letting a court sell the property, discuss how it may help you reach an agreement. Recommend other strategies that you could use to accomplish a successful negotiation.

b. Discuss your power sources and your co-owner's power sources in this negotiation, and analyze how you can strengthen your power position.

c. Propose a logical and an emotional argument to persuade your co-owner to agree to a deal.

d. Describe a nonverbal communication technique that you will use to persuade your co-owner that your proposal is a win-win proposition.

e. Describe a threat you can make that would force your co-owner to make concessions.

Your paper should be four to five pages in length (not including title and reference pages). Format your paper according to APA style as outlined in the Ashford Writing Center, and utilize three to four scholarly sources in addition to the textbook. Be sure to cite your sources within the body of your paper and on the reference page.

The purpose of this exercise is to apply the five negotiation skills presented in this chapter to an actual negotiation situation. You have inherited from your parents half of an undivided interest in a summer home with some prime acreage on a nearby lake. Your co-owner was your father's friend and partner in a number of enterprises. For years your two families have shared this summer house on alternating weekends and holidays without any problems. Your co-owner, however, is ready to sell the property and believes someone will buy it to redevelop it from a summer cottage to four upscale vacation homes. You are not interested in selling, but are willing to buy out your co-owner at the current fair market value. That value is considerably less than your co-owner believes the property is worth. When you can't reach agreement, your co-owner simply sells his interest to a third party, who may or may not be the potential developer. This new co-owner tries to buy you out, and when you refuse he begins to make changes to the property without consulting you. When you complain, he threatens to petition a court to force the sale of the land—which would mean both of you would lose control, which he thinks you are not willing to allow. You decide to try to negotiate a deal so you can continue to use the property as you did when you were growing up. In order to do so, your co-owner will have to shelve any improvement plans he has for the property.

Apply the chapter negotiation skills as you answer the following questions.
Skill 5.1. Assuming your BATNA is letting a court sell the property, can it help
you reach an agreement? Why or why not?
Skill 5.2. What are your power sources and your co-owner's power sources in
this negotiation? How can you strengthen your power position?
Skill 5.3. Can you present a logical and an emotional argument to persuade your
co-owner to agree to a deal?
Skill 5.4. What nonverbal communication technique might you use to persuade
your co-owner that your proposal is a win-win proposition?
Skill 5.5. What threat can you make to force your co-owner to make concessions?

Book Website:
http://www.coursesmart.com/SR/6356912/0131868861/108?__hdv=6.8

Book:
Carrell, M.R. & Heavrin, C. (2008). Negotiating essentials: Theory, skills, and practices. Upper Saddle, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall.

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Solution Preview

Skill 5.1. Assuming your BATNA is letting a court sell the property, can it help
you reach an agreement? Why or why not?

The only reason why people negotiate is to procure a result that is better than one that will be obtained if they do not negotiate. Therefore , BATNA - the best alternative to a negotiated agreement , is the standard against which the negotiation outcome should be compared. BATNA is a powerful tool to make sure that you do not end up with a very unfavourable outcome ( worse than your BATNA ) or end up rejecting an outcome that is better than your BATNA( Fisher et al, 1991).

Since in this case the BATNA is letting the court sell the property, which is the best alternative without negotiation. A deal that will prevent matters from going this far, where both lose control, will be better than BATNA.Now the objective is to negotiate and come to an agreement that is better than this.

It is also necessary to consider the opponent's BATNA, or the alternatives open to the other side.
Under the circumstances reaching an agreement would be best for both sides as the alternative is losing control altogether and handing over the property to the court.

You are not interested in selling, but are willing to buy out your co-owner at the current fair market value. That value is considerably less than your co-owner believes the property is worth. The new co-owner tries to buy you out, and when you refuse he begins to make changes to the property without consulting you.

Considering what you stand to lose, it is best to reach an agreement, as walking away would only mean losing control altogether and ultimate sale of the land at prices fixed by the court.

Skill 5.2. What are your power sources and your co-owner's power sources in
this negotiation? How can you strengthen your power position?

. I. William Zartman and Jeffrey Z. Rubin(2002) argue that weaker and stronger parties negotiating together know their roles and are able to get appropriate benefits to each side in a negotiated ...

Solution Summary

The article looks at the role of BATNA in negotiating an agreement, the role of non verbal communication, the sources of power, logical and emotional appeals, and the role of threats in negotiations.

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21st Century Leadership: Steve Job's leadership style, achievement motivation theory, leader motive profile, three process motivation theories, steps to take in a negotiation, functional/dysfunctional conflict.

I am having trouble completing one of my homework assignments and would like help in answering the attached questions which are similar to my homework questions. I will use the attached as a learning guide.

Please provide full detailed answers. Thank you.

1. CASE: Steve Jobs" Apple
Fortune ranked Apple #1 on its list of America's and the World's Most Admired Companies, and Steve Jobs was ranked #1 on its Most Powerful Businesspeople in the World. But he didn't start at the top. Together with Apple Computer co-founder Steve Wozniak, 21-year-old Steven Paul Jobs developed and built the personal computer (PC) in 1976 in Jobs' family garage. The Apple II kicked off the PC era in 1977, and in 1984 the Macintosh altered the direction of the computer industry. Jobs is also credited with desktop publishing, laser printers, and for pioneering personal computer networks.

Jobs went on to create Pixar technology and a new business model for creating computer-animated feature films. More recent innovations under Jobs' leadership include the iPod, iTunes, iMovie, Apple TV, games, QuickTime Player (and other software), Apple Stores, and iPhone. He is ranked #1 for his leadership and power in influencing five industries: computers, Hollywood, music, retailing, and wireless phones. So far, no one has had more influence over a broader range of businesses than Jobs.

Apple hasn't left its PC computer roots. When most people think of Apple today, the "i"products may come to mind; however, the hottest line is actually its Macintosh business because it has the status as the company's largest revenue source. Mac sales have grown at triple the rate of the rest of the PC industry. Apple is growing faster because it improves its hardware and software more often than anyone else.

Apple and Jobs have had some problems along the way in their 30+ year history. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, IBM saw the success of the Apple PC and developed its own PC for business that was not compatible with the Apple operating system. IBM PCs were soon outselling Apple. Jobs decided that to compete he needed to bring in professional management to grow the company. Jobs hired John Sculley to replace him as CEO. Apple ran into problems, and Sculley and Jobs did not agree on how to run the company. The Apple board of directors choose Sculley over Jobs as CEO. Jobs lost control over the company he had started.

As chairman of the board, Jobs had no real power or meaningful work to do. So Jobs left Apple in 1985 to start NeXT (a computer platform development company specializing in the higher education and business markets). In 1986, Steve Jobs started what became Pixar Animated Studios and became its CEO. Jobs contracted with Disney to produce a number of computer-animated feature films, which Disney would co-finance and distribute. Films included Toy Story, A Bug's Life, Monsters, Inc., Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, and Cars. In 1997, Apple acquired NeXT to use its technology in its Apple computers and Jobs returned to Apple. Apple was still not doing well so the board appointed Jobs to his earlier position as CEO. In 2006, Jobs sold Pixar to Disney and remains on its board as its largest shareholder.

Back as CEO of Apple, Jobs led the company from the brink of bankruptcy through the most dramatic corporate turnaround in the history of Silicon Valley. Jobs changed its culture back to a more entrepreneurial atmosphere. Jobs is a visionary, and Apple's success is born of continual and artful innovation in every aspect of its business. According to Jobs, Apple's success comes from simply trying to make great products that we want for ourselves, and then hope that customers love them as much as we do. Through self-assessment, Jobs realized his strength was in developing new products. The future of Apple depends on frequent product introductions and transitions. Therefore, Jobs places his focus and time on overseeing design teams who develop new products; the design teams have input into what is designed and how.

Jobs is also among the most controversial figures in the business. People who have worked for Jobs over the years have mixed reactions to his leadership style. Some call him temperamental, aggressive, tough, intimidating, and very demanding. He has been known to verbally attack people who make mistakes and are not meeting goals and expectations. Yet, employees who perform up to expectation are well rewarded. He is outspoken and not afraid to anger employees and customers. Even many who feared him also had great respect for him as he did inspire loyalty, enthusiasm, and high levels of performance through continuous innovation. Even people who left Apple say it's often brutal and Jobs hogs the credit, but they've never done better work.

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft, calls Jobs a visionary with intuitive taste. Steve makes decisions based on a sense of people and products. He does things differently, and it's magical. Jobs' ability to always come around and figure out where that next bet should be has been phenomenal. Gates and Jobs worked together in the early days of the development of the PC.

Answer the following:
1. Which of the leadership theory classifications do you see apply to this case? Which one do you consider as most relevant? Explain your choice.

2. Evaluate the Achievement Motivation Theory and the Leader Motive Profile.

3. Compare and contrast the three process motivation theories.

4. What steps would you follow in a negotiation?

5. How would you distinguish between a functional and a dysfunctional conflict? How does each affect performance?

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