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Statistics for Managers: Work-in-Process

In many manufacturing processes, the term work-in-process(WIP) is used. In a book manufacturing plant, the WIP represents the time it takes for sheets from a press to be folded, gathered, sewn, tipped on end sheets, and bound. The data contained below represent samples of 20 books at each of two production plants and the processing time (operationally defined as the time, in days, from when the books came off the press to when they were packed in cartons) for these jobs:

Plant A

5.62 5.29 16.25 10.92 11.46 21.62 8.45 8.58 5.41 11.42
11.62 7.29 7.50 7.96 4.42 10.50 7.58 9.29 7.54 8.92

Plant B

9.54 11.46 16.62 12.62 25.75 15.41 14.29 13.13 13.71 10.04 5.75
12.46 9.17 13.21 6.00 2.33 14.25 5.37 6.25 9.71

Necessary Data:
Processing Time Plant
5.62 1
5.29 1
16.25 1
10.92 1
11.46 1
21.62 1
8.45 1
8.58 1
5.41 1
11.42 1
11.62 1
7.29 1
7.5 1
7.96 1
4.42 1
10.5 1
7.58 1
9.29 1
7.54 1
8.92 1
9.54 2
11.46 2
16.62 2
12.62 2
25.75 2
15.41 2
14.29 2
13.13 2
13.71 2
10.04 2
5.75 2
12.46 2
9.17 2
13.21 2
6 2
2.33 2
14.25 2
5.37 2
6.25 2
9.71 2

For each of the two plants:

a. Compute the mean, median, first quartile, and third quartile.
b. Compute the range, interquartile range, variance, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation.
c. Construct side-by-side box-and-whisker plots.Are the data skewed? If so, how?
d. On the basis of the results of (a) through (c), are there any difference between the two plants? Explain.

Solution Summary

The manufacturing processes of two plants are analyzed.

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