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Backlog of Court Cases

How would you ease the backlog of court cases? Do you think they drag on too long? Would you plea bargain more cases? Answer anyone of the three questions. Keep your answer short.

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Please see attached response, which is also presented below. I hope this helps and take care.

RESPONSE:

1. How would you ease the backlog of court cases? Do you think they drag on too long? Would you plea-bargain more cases? Answer one of the three questions. Keep your answer short

Interesting questions! Let's look at the first one and several potential ways to ease the backlog of court cases.

The main concern is not really how many cases are still unheard but how fast they are heard and dealt with. Briefly, there are several proposed ways to ease the backlog of the court case, ranging freeing defendants whose cases have stalled for long periods of time e.g. since Hurricane Katrina, to drafting volunteer prosecutors and public defenders and installing new centralized systems to serve court subpoenas to police officers faster therefore increasing their court attendance. Other methods of easing the backlog of the court cases would be such things as increasing the number of criminal court judges, introduce the functioning of the existing courts in two shifts e.g., night court, fixing of case by judges to keep them moving in the right direction, e.g., not put on the shelf and forgotten about, increasing the use of Alternate Distribution Resolution (ADR) methods, and shelving all complex business cases that tie up the courts for long periods of time.

Let's look a bit closer at examples of the above methods.

For example, based on the opinions of a New Orleans criminal court judge, there are several ways to ease the backlog of court cases ...

Solution Summary

This solution explains some innovative ways to ease the backlog of court cases.

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