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Fatal Attraction/Stanford Prison Experiment

Part I
In the movie "Fatal Attraction" the main character is suffering from a mental illness. Analyze the character's illness in terms of one or more of the theoretical perspectives (e.g. biological, psychoanalytic, cognitive-behavioral, biopsychosocial). Be sure to include references.
- Describe the character's diagnosis in terms of the DSM-IV, be sure to include (2) criteria that the character meets.
- Describe (1) perspective(s) of mental illness that best explains the development of the character's symptoms, along with at least (2) supporting facts.
- Describe any treatment received by the character. Describe (2) reasons that you would recommend similar or different treatment. If the character did not receive treatment, describe the type of treatment you would recommend with (2) supporting facts.

Part II
In evaluating the Stanford Prison Study, respond to the following:
- Describe (1) factor that prevented "good guards" from objecting or countermanding the orders from tough or bad guards.
- Describe (1) reason why prisoners try to work within the arbitrary prison system to effect a change in it (e.g. Setting up a grievance committee), rather than trying to dismantle or change the system through outside help.
- Describe (2) factors that would lead prisoners to attribute guard brutality to the guard's disposition or character, rather than to the situation.
- Do you think it was ethical to conduct the study? Provide (2) reasons to support your position

Be sure to include references

Solution Preview

Part I

In the movie fatal attraction the suffering from a mental illness. Analyze the character's illness in terms of one or more of the theoretical perspective (e.g. Biological, psychoanalytic, cognitive-behavioral, biopsychosocial).

Stalking consists of chronic nuisance behaviors by an offender that result in deleterious emotional and/or physical effects on a victim (Sansome and L. A. Sansome, 2010). The practice of stalking could be viewed as an illogical or irrational preoccupation with another individual. According to Sansome and L. A. Sansome, because of the unusual and intense attachment style associated with borderline personality disorder; it is suggestive of stalking behavior. This type of behavior is evident in the character of Alex Forrest (Glenn Close) in the movie Fatal Attraction (1987), as she stalks, torments, and threatens her married, one-night-stand lover, Dan Gallagher (Michael Douglas). The character of Forrest shows that she suffers from borderline personality disorder (BPD). Based on Diagnostic and Statistical Behaviors of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR [APA]. 2000), BPD manifests from a variety of behaviors, and has underlying psychopathology.

Describe the character's diagnosis in terms of the DSM-IV, be sure to include (2) criteria that the character meets.

A primary diagnosis for Alex Gross (Glen Close's) character in the movie Fatal Attraction is that she is suffering from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). In observing her actions in the movie she appears to be in a crisis mood and behavior. Based on the DSM-IV-TR [APA], 2000), the concept of BPD is that the person is on the borderline between neurosis and psychosis. The formal diagnostic definition given for this disorder in the DSM-IV-TR is that it is a "Pervasive pattern of instability of interpersonal relationships, self-image and affects, and marked impulsivity beginning by early adulthood and present in a variety of content (p. 710). Based on DSM-IV-TR criteria, the person must meet at least five of 9 features for diagnosis of the disorder. Alex presents with the following symptoms that meet DSM-IV-TR (2000) criteria: (a) identity disturbance markedly and persistently unstable self-image or sense of self, (b) self-mutilating behavior, (c) affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood ...

Solution Summary

This solution examines human nature in the context of personality and behavioral disorders.

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