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Maslow: Psychological Basic Motives

Consider the artist Pablo Picasso, who would become so involved in painting that he did not eat, sleep, or associate with others for days at a time. At other times, he was driven by public adoration, wanting to outdo his rival, Matisse. How do these events compare to Maslow's theory that basic motives must be satisfied before those farther up the hierarchy?

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1. Consider the artist Pablo Picasso, who would become so involved in painting that he did not eat, sleep, or associate with others for days at a time. At other times, he was driven by public adoration, wanting to outdo his rival, Matisse. How do these events compare to Maslow's theory that basic motives must be satisfied before those farther up the hierarchy?

According to Maslow's hierarchy of needs, beyond the basic physiological needs of air, water, food, and sex, he laid out five other layers of needs: the need for safety and security, the need for love and belonging, the need for esteem, and the need to actualize the self, in that order. When the physiological needs are largely taken care of, this second layer of needs comes into play. You will become increasingly interested ...

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This solution considers the artist Pablo Picasso's behavior in terms of Maslow's theory that basic motives must be satisfied before those farther up the hierarchy.

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