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Gender differences in language use: using text samples

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I would like help in putting together an explanation (summary) and problem statement for my topic "Gender differences in language use; text samples, with a focus on adult female and males." I have attached the article for a quick review. I am having a hard time getting started. Any directions and examples of how to begin would be greatly appreciated.

Please see the following reference:
Newman, M. L., Groom, C. J., Handelman, L. D., & Pennebaker, J. W. (2008). Gender differences in language use: An analysis of 14,000 text samples. Discourse Processes, 45(3), 211-236.

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Solution Preview

Let me go through the article you enclosed and give a basic summary and some ideas as to where to go from there.

The point here is that the data set is far larger than earlier studies ? using too few writing or speaking samples will not give reliable results.

Here are the findings of the earlier work in this field:

Women use questions more.
Men seem more ?commanding? in their speech and writing
boys are more ready to offer opinions
Female language is more tentative; it's more ?hedging? when offering opinions
Men seem to use longer words and often, harsher ones.
(The problem with these conclusions is that the samples used in the study were too small. As it turns out, these conclusions are false (or exaggerated)).

The expectation of this study was that men would be more prone to be informative and analytic, while women would be more personally involved in their writing.

Here is a summary of the results:

Women use more words.
Women use slightly more ?feeling? words
Women use slightly more negative emotion words
Women are more prone to use ...

Solution Summary

The following posting discusses gender differences in language use.

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PART 1
Give at least two examples of the functional differences between the genders that impact learners. As a teacher, how might you meet the gender-specific needs of learners taking into consideration the functional differences? Describe/discuss some strategies. Provide specific examples in two subject areas e.g. language arts, math, P.E., music, science, etc. Use the text and any outside source for references in your post.

PART 2
You have been asked to give a presentation on the importance of physical movement and the brain to the Parent Teacher Student Association of your local grammar school. Identify a minimum of six key points that you would include in you presentation. Use the text and one other academic reference which you should cite in APA format. With so much research on the importance of physical activity to enhance brain function, why are so many schools throughout the U.S. cutting P.E. from the curriculum?

Give at least two examples of the functional differences between the genders that impact learners. As a teacher, how might you meet the gender-specific needs of learners taking into consideration the functional differences? Describe/discuss some strategies. Provide specific examples in two subject areas e.g. language arts, math, P.E., music, science, etc. Use the text and any outside source for references in your post.

Anyone who has been around kids for any length of time knows that girls and boys are fundamentally different in certain aspects of learning and behavior. This is a topic of conversation and amusement among family members and parents in general. However, these functional differences tend to be a source of frustration for teachers as these little boys and girls enter the classroom environment. One functional difference is that boys tend to learn better in noisy, environments. Parents with boys can relate to the fact that boys can have the TV on loud while at the same time be playing with toys on the carpet in front of the TV. When boys play together they also tend to be loud and make loud noises with objects or with their mouth. Girls, on the other hand, often will play quietly either talking to themselves in hushed tones or not speaking at all. Another functional difference is that boys learn better when they are allowed time for unstructured activity while girls tend to favor face to face discussions. (Adcox, n.d.)

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