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ways to advocate for a patient without being overly subjective

How can one go about advocating for meeting one's own professional needs without becoming too "subjective" in our practice with human services clients?

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Medical and social service professionals are, above all, human. Without the capacity for empathy and a desire to help others, they would not choose their particular career. However, being human each professional also brings his or her own cultural views, biases, and innate beliefs into the professional setting - whether overt or covert.

There are many ways to continue to advocate for a patient without becoming overly subjective. One may have a hard time advocating for a homeless drug-addict, for instance, who despite all social help seems not to want to improve his/her status. If the psychologist, for instance, remembers the writings of John Watson and behaviorism, they will have an organized tool for understanding the root of the subject: "Behaviorism claims that 'consciousness' is neither a definable nor a usable concept; that it is merely another word for the 'soul' or more ancient times (Watson, pg 1)." One of Watson's biggest hurdles to get over was this change from a school of thought that was based on consciousness to one that believed it was not needed at all. "By eliminating states of consciousness as proper objects of investigation, Watson sought to remove the barrier of subjectivity from psychology which exists between it and the other sciences (http://fates.cns.muskingum.edu/~psych/psycweb/history/watson.htm)." ...

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This job offers ways to continue to advocate for a patient without becoming overly subjective.

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