Share
Explore BrainMass

Plato: What makes something/someone Holy?

From Euthyphro, evaluate Plato's argument that what is holy and what is approved of by the gods are not the same thing. Is it convincing?
Can you think of any arguments Euthyphro could have given in reply?

Solution Preview

Dear Student,
The solution below should provide you with some ideas to get you started. I hope it helps.

Sincerely,
OTA 105878/Xenia Jones
--------------------------------------------------

Plato's Eutyphro Dilemma

In Plato's dialouge Eutyphro, his main character Socrates asks Eutyphro -
"Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?"

The center of the debate was piety. For Eutyphro, the pious is loved by the gods. Socrates is unsure however as the gods have their own interpretations of what is pious (the Greeks following a Pantheon of gods displaying their own preferences). To counter this, Eutyphro then changes his definition adding that what is pious is what is unanimously accepted by all gods as such. Then Socrates counters - which came first - the love of the gods because the subjects were pious or the pious being pious even before the gods bestowed their affection? Both Eutyphro and Socrates agree - the gods love the pious but also reject the notion that it is only because of their piety that they are loved. Why is this? If we follow this notion, according to Socrates, what we will have is a vicious cycle, a conditional situation wherein gods' love can only be given if piety is practiced and displayed. without piety, there is no divine love and without the assurance of divine ...

Solution Summary

The solution is a 942-word essay that comprehensively discuss Plato's Eutyphro Dilemma wherein his main character Socrates asks Eutyphro - "Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?" Plato's argument on holy and holiness (as approved by the gods) is discussed according to its strength and other moral, religious and social interpretations. The implications are given examples by referring them to modern arguments of morality, religion and theism. A word version is attached for easy printing. References are also listed for expansion.

$2.19