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Health Injuries

1.Mr. MacPherson came into the emergency department with burns on both of his arms and hands and on his face as the result of a grease fire in his kitchen. He complained of severe pain. His burns showed signs of blistering, swelling and fluid loss. What percentage of his body was burned? What classification is his burn, and why?
2.Margie, who plays center on the women's varsity basketball team, ended up at the bottom of a pile-up during a game. When she arrives at the doctor's office, she complains that her knee is very sore. She mentions that she felt a "pop" at the time of the injury, and the knee buckles under her weight. What should the physician check, and why?
3.Susan, age 39, is a secretary. She spends most of her working day at a desk. Recently she has complained of feeling tired even though she gets 7 to 8 hours of sleep a night. Her doctor has recommended a walking program to counteract her sedentary lifestyle. She is reluctant to begin. What could you tell Susan about the benefits of regular exercise? What muscular problems are likely to result if she does not begin exercise?

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Respond to each case. with references

1.Mr. MacPherson came into the emergency department with burns on both of his arms and hands and on his face as the result of a grease fire in his kitchen. He complained of severe pain. His burns showed signs of blistering, swelling and fluid loss. What percentage of his body was burned? What classification is his burn, and why?

Second-degree (partial thickness) burns would represent the burns that Mr. MacPherson has received because the burn site is blistered involving the epidermis and part of the dermis layer of skin as well as being ...

Solution Summary

Health management and injuries.

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