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Optimum Performance Model (OPT)

Deb, We have being working with the OPT MODEL for a while, which integrates several interdependent components of performance enhancement and injury prevention programs. Could you provide some feedback on the following questions.

See attachment 1. Application

1. In your experiences, which training components have been the most successful for you (and your clients)?
2. In what ways has your training style been helped or hindered by applying the principles outlined in the OPT Model?

Attachment 2. Provide a general overview of the OPT model for your reference.

3. How would you apply the OPT Model to a team-based (or group-based) setting? What unique challenges are presented? What strategies might you use to address them?
4. In what ways can you 'monetize' this training approach to add value to your current (or future) practice?

If you need more feedback about the OPT Model please feel free to ask me more question. I will be more than happy to provide more details about this model.

Any help will be much appreciated. Thank you!

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Hi.

Interesting model! Let's take a closer look.

RESPONSE:

1. In your experiences, which training components have been the most successful for you (and your clients)?

The OPT Model provides a system for properly and safely progressing and regressing any client to his/her goals, by utilizing integrated training methods. It consists of three phases: Stabilization, Strength, and Power.

(1). Stabilization Training addresses muscular imbalances and attempts to improve the stabilization of joints and overall posture. This is a component that most training programs leave out even though it is the most important in ensuring that the nervous system and muscular system are working together properly. This training phase has two sub-phases. Phase

1: Corrective Exercise Training and Phase 2: Integrated Stabilization Training.

(2). Strength Training focuses on increasing levels of muscle size, and/or maximal strength. Most traditional programs begin at this point and as a result often lead to injury. This can also inhibit strength since the body will only allow itself to grow as big and strong as it can stabilize. This phase of training has three sub-phases. Phase 3: Stabilization Equivalent Training, Phase 4: Muscular Development Training, and Phase 5: Maximal Strength Training.

(3). Power Training that is designed to target specific forms of training that are necessary for maximal force production. This phase has two sub-phases. Phase 6: Elastic Equivalent Training and Phase 7: Maximal Power Training.

All of these phases of training have been scientifically designed to follow biomechanical, physiological, and functional principles of the nervous system, the muscular system, and the skeletal system. Most clients will never reach higher than sub-phase 4 (so perhaps the prior stages have been most helpful, for most clients) and that's okay. You will need to discuss this with your client, and which of the phases that are right for her or him. It is situational, and no one program fits for all people.

Is this how you see it?

2. In what ways has your training style been helped or hindered by applying the principles outlined in the ...

Solution Summary

In reference to the Optimum Performance Model (OPT), this solution discusses training components that are the most successful in performance enhancement and injury prevention programs and ways that a trainer's training style can either help or hinder through application of the principles outlined in the OPT Model. It also expalins ways to apply the OPT Model to a team-based (or group-based) setting including unique challenges and strategies to address them. Ways to 'monetize' this training approach to add value to a current (or future) practice are also overviewed.

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