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    "Kubla Kahn" reader response

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    This solution briefly offers a reader response interpretation of Coleridge's "Kubla Kahn."

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:54 pm ad1c9bdddf
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/poetry/617577

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    Welcome to BrainMass! Please rate 5/5 for my ideas.

    My interpretation of Coleridge's "Kubla Kahn" is that he uses poetic language to offer a linguistic snapshot of the lavish palace of the Mongol ruler, glorifying its exoticism through images such as "A stately pleasure dome decree."

    The poem also offers the juxtaposition of nature's beauty and viciousness, major themes common with the Romantic Movement. Nature's wonder is expressed through gorgeous recollection, such as "Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; And here were forests ancient as the hills/Enfolding sunny spots of greenery." His comparison of it as "...a miracle of rare device/A sunny pleasure dome with caves of ice" further adds to its exotic appeal and allure.

    In contrast, the harshness of nature is shown through the description of "A savage place! as holy and enchanted/As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted/By woman wailing for her demon lover!" Devastation and dread, strong emotional expressions, are uttered when "Then reached the caverns measureless to man/And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean." Spirits are also summoned, evoking an eerie mood with "As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted."

    Besides, I also believe that the innocent vision of the alleged maiden, "A damsel with a dulcimer/In a vision once I saw" further contrasts strongly with the fierceness of the ruler with his lineage so rooted in violence as "Ancestral voices prophesying war!" His specification of the "sunless sea" also depicts a setting of desolation and fear.

    In addition, the poem also seems to resonate with the prowess and power of Kubla Khan and how he almost possessed mythical powers as "His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread, For he on honeydew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise," almost blaming him for the destruction of nature and fear imposed on his kingdom as a whole.

    This content was COPIED from BrainMass.com - View the original, and get the already-completed solution here!

    © BrainMass Inc. brainmass.com December 24, 2021, 11:54 pm ad1c9bdddf>
    https://brainmass.com/english-language-and-literature/poetry/617577

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