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Rules of Etiquette in Writing

The author of this piece of writing presents a fun, but tasteful, suggestion for helping readers learn how to master the rules of etiquette in writing; some comical, and others very serious. Read on and enjoy pure fun.

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"Be rude!!! What???"

"Yes, be rude."

You see... "If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is because everything would be what it isn't. And contrary-wise; what it is it wouldn't be, and what it wouldn't be, it would. You see?" (Alice in Wonderland)

All of your life, you've been told to be polite to rude and unkind individuals, but in order for you to learn how to correct some of your mistakes, my advice is that you first bring them to light by starting with a rough draft that truly says how you feel. So my suggestion for learning the rules of etiquette for writing are to first break them, and then work backwards to explain your way out of the situation. Hence, whatever you can't justify saying or provide a rationalization for, should be deleted. Likewise, if you read the letter, put yourself in the shoes of the individual on the receiving end, and think you might be offended if you received the same correspondence, you'll know that something needs to be changed.

To help you get started with this exercise, think of a time in your life, preferably a business scenario, when someone made you so angry that it inspired you to write a letter. While recounting the events of your ...

Solution Summary

The intention behind this piece of writing is to help writers determine when being rude can pay-off and in other instances, work against them. By asking them to take things to the extreme and come full circle to correct offensive behavior that wouldn't otherwise be acceptable in professional arenas, they are forced to come face-to-face with analyzing how they would feel if they had to trade places with the person on the receiving end. Hence, it's never wrong to say what's on your mind, but there is a way to say it and keep yourself out of hot water. Exercises like this allow readers to blow off a little steam, step back and reexamine their verbiage and make an educated decision about whether they should move forward with sending their correspondence as is, edit it or start anew.

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