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    Sample Intelligence Scale with Questions

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    Use reading material, lecture, and other sources to create a test that measures some of the following thinking skills:
    Verbal scales:
    Information: Similar to "Trivial Pursuit," this subtest measures fund of factual information. It is strongly influenced by culture. An American education and intact long-term memory will contribute to a higher score. Sample question (not really on the tests): "What is the capital of France?"
    Comprehension: This subtest measures understanding of social conventions and common sense. It is also culturally loaded. Sample question: "What is the thing to do if you find an injured person laying on the sidewalk?"
    Digit Span: Requires the repetition of number strings forward and backwards. Measures concentration, attention, and immediate memory. Lower scores are obtained by persons with an attention deficit or anxiety.
    Similarities: This subtest measures verbal abstract reasoning and conceptualization abilities. The individual is asked how two things are alike. Sample question: "How are a snake and an alligator alike?"

    Vocabulary: This test measures receptive and expressive vocabulary. It is the best overall measure of general intelligence (assuming the test-taker's native language is English). Sample question: "What is the meaning of the word 'articulate'?"
    Performance Scales:
    Object Assembly: Consists of jigsaw puzzles. Measures visual-spatial abilities and ability to see how parts make up a whole (this subtest is optional on the revised Weschler tests).

    Block Design: One of the strongest measures of nonverbal intelligence and reasoning. Consists of colored blocks which are put together to make designs.
    Digit Symbol/Coding/Animal House: Symbols are matched with numbers or shapes according to a key. Measures visual-motor speed and short-term visual memory.
    Picture Arrangement: Requires that pictures be arranged in order to tell a story. Measures nonverbal understanding of social interaction and ability to reason sequentially.
    Picture Concepts: A new subtest on the WISC-IV. Requires matching pictures which belong together based on common characteristics. Measures non-verbal concept formation and reasoning; a non-verbal counterpart of Similarities.
    Picture Completion: Requires recognition of the missing part in pictures. Measures visual perception, long-term visual memory, and the ability to differentiate essential from inessential details.
    Matrix Reasoning: (WAIS-III only) Modeled after Raven's Progressive Matrices, this is an untimed test which measures abstract nonverbal reasoning ability. It consists of a sequence or group of designs, and the individual is required to fill in a missing design from a number of choices.
    For your test you may use images or just words.

    You can use images or just words.

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    Solution Preview

    I will provide sample questions for each section outlined in your problem section.

    Information:
    What were the original 13 colonies?
    Who fought in World War II?
    Name all of the continents on earth.
    What are the four seasons?

    Comprehension:
    If a baby is ...

    Solution Summary

    Provides a sampling of questions to use on a hypothetical scale to measure intelligence.

    $2.19