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Problems with No Child Left behind in Special Education

Address the requirement for improved performance of students with disabilities under the No Child Left Behind Act in a inclusion classroom, and the controversy regarding the practice of inclusion.

This is an overview of the way I have experienced Inclusion and other special education models. I discuss adaptations, IEPs and goals, support to those in inclusion programs, and if these programs could be considered successful.

I discuss how departments obtain what they need to successfully adapt and modify lessons, and the growing desire of some instructors who are interested in failing students who have never had to deal with such extreme measures after years of extra help.

I also discuss the politics of public school in general. The operating costs of keeping a school open, with enough staff, and how many administrators wish special education would simply go away.

Solution Preview

The requirements of students in California under the NCLB Act, to be accepted into inclusion, must be within 2 grade levels below and no lower to be accepted into inclusion. Often parents request it when it is not really in the best interest of the child, so my local district then tried to find students who at least had some social skills, so they would fit better in the typical classroom environment. NCLB has not been helpful for disabled students in California from my experience teaching here for over ten years. Further, if a child cannot be included at an early age, and begin to gain more skills to feel accomplished and proud of their work, inclusion creates failure for many of these students. It can also be noted that children with disabilities often want to spend time with people who have similar interests within the inclusion group. The least restrictive environment is ...

Solution Summary

In this solution I discuss the growing controversy of testing, and how it affects those students in special education. I discuss the inclusion model, the way it really happens in schools where I have taught, and the implications for who is still left behind