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Scaffolded Instruction

What do you know about scaffolding? How would you incorporate scaffolding into instruction?

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Scaffolded Instruction
A common and effective strategy for helping students develop their higher order thinking skills is scaffolding. My own first exposure to scaffolding in education came when I was attending a high school where there was some construction in progress. The workers had erected a series of temporary structures (called scaffolding), which permitted the workers to carry out their work in high places. When the work was finished, the scaffolding was removed. The term scaffolding has been developed as a useful metaphor for an effective method for helping students develop their thinking skills. The teacher, the textual materials, or other students provide temporary support (like scaffolding in the construction industry) to help students bridge the gap between their current abilities and the intended goal. Scaffolds can be tools, such as written guidelines or cue cards, or techniques, such as modeling or prompting by the teacher. Like the physical structures supporting construction around my high school, instructional scaffolding is temporary and adjustable. As students demonstrate greater proficiency on their own, the scaffolding is gradually removed. Table 12.3 summarizes the steps included in a typical scaffolding strategy (Rosenshine & Meister, 1992).
http://fno.org/dec99/scaffold.html

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For me, scaffolding during instruction describes specialized teaching strategies that are geared to support learning when students are first introduced to a new subject. I used scaffolding to give students a context, a motivation, or a foundation from which to understand new information that I was planning to introduce during upcoming lessons.

I think scaffolding techniques should be considered fundamental to good, solid teaching for all students, and not just for those with learning disabilities or second language learners. For me, in order for learning to progress, I ...

Solution Summary

Scaffolded Instruction
A common and effective strategy for helping students develop their higher order thinking skills is scaffolding. My own first exposure to scaffolding in education came when I was attending a high school where there was some construction in progress. The workers had erected a series of temporary structures (called scaffolding), which permitted the workers to carry out their work in high places. When the work was finished, the scaffolding was removed. The term scaffolding has been developed as a useful metaphor for an effective method for helping students develop their thinking skills. The teacher, the textual materials, or other students provide temporary support (like scaffolding in the construction industry) to help students bridge the gap between their current abilities and the intended goal. Scaffolds can be tools, such as written guidelines or cue cards, or techniques, such as modeling or prompting by the teacher. Like the physical structures supporting construction around my high school, instructional scaffolding is temporary and adjustable. As students demonstrate greater proficiency on their own, the scaffolding is gradually removed. Table 12.3 summarizes the steps included in a typical scaffolding strategy (Rosenshine & Meister, 1992).
http://fno.org/dec99/scaffold.html

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