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Project Management: Utilitarian or Totalitarian

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A project manager must act ethically and in accordance with the project purpose and overall end state. Ethics with the project managers team must be strong and comprehensive. A project manager must at times be totalitarian in order to get what needs to be done completed. By being totalitarian, the project manager must at times have to get down to the lowest level of responsibility to get the job done rapidly and correctly. This ethical form of managing might be considered micro-managing, but, at times, it is required. For instance, if I have to send an item back for rework more than once, I will personally inspect what is being done and re-train my worker on the spot, if necessary.

Totalitarianism should not reign the whole time. If it were so, then the other team members will be not as willing to work along or completely shut the project manager out. So a two prong approach must be used, to coincide with being utilitarian. By being utilitarian, the project manager puts an emphasis on project completion, without harming the professional relationships between the team. But when sweet talk and positive reinforcement leads to little to no action. Totalitarian ethics must take place, because the project is the priority.

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A project manager must absolutely act ethically at all times. This begins with establishing the standards and values that the group must abide by, in alignment with the organization's mission. A project manager is tasked with getting the task done, through others. I understand the need to micromanage occasionally, but in the long run, a project manager and his or her ...

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This solution responds to a post on a project manager's ethics in management.