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    What are the common problems in running an effective team meeting? Briefly describe five such problems and suggest ways to resolve them.

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    1. What are the common problems in running an effective team meeting? Briefly describe five such problems and suggest ways to resolve them.

    2. You are introduced to a project manager, who does not have authority to give a pay raise or promote a project team member. This project manager can report poor performance of a team member to the employee's manager. The project manager also does not control the budget. Product management allocates the budget. Given this context, what can this project manager do to energize the project team?

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    1. What are the common problems in running an effective team meeting?Briefly describe five such problems and suggest ways to resolve them.
    (3-4 pages)
    PROBLEMS

    ? Not staying focused on the purpose of the meeting.
    Often the team members do not stay focused on the reason for the meeting because they
    don't know it. Too many times the meeting is called without communicating the desired
    outcomes of the time together or asking team members if the purpose is a worthwhile use
    of their time.
    ? Not agreeing with the purpose of the meeting.
    Hidden or conflicting agendas often cause team meetings to be unsuccessful because part
    of the group is trying to achieve a certain goal while other factions have different goals.
    ? Not hearing or validating all team members.
    Some team members tend to be "heard" by the remainder of the team, more than other
    team members. This could be due to experience, influence, power, charisma or sheer
    volume. Other team members' ideas are dismissed or ignored.
    ? Improper balance between relationship and task focus.
    Team meetings often tend to one extreme of the relationship-task continuum. Sometimes
    getting "through" everything seems like a steamroller is running the meeting, while other
    meetings waste too much time in finding out how the weekend went.
    ? Not going for closure in agenda items at the proper time.
    It is difficult to know when to try to move onto the next agenda item. Often an item is
    discussed for much longer than is necessary - attendees were in "violent agreement" but
    didn't come to closure soon enough. The other extreme is not allowing sufficient
    discussion on items. If the item and root causes aren't discussed thoroughly the first time,
    they will resurface again as the same issue, or disguised as a new issue.
    ? Shutting down ideas too soon to be heard.
    In the hopes of "getting through the agenda", not wanting to discuss a contentious issue or
    not valuing a team member's input, many ideas are shut down before they have the
    opportunity to be considered by the entire team. Closing down ideas quickly allows the
    team meeting to move forward quickly, but doesn't allow for divergent or different
    perspectives which might be of value to the team.
    ? Not taking the time to evaluate team meeting behaviors and processes.
    At the end of a team meeting, most members want out of the meeting. They've spent
    enough time in a meeting without talking about the process of the meeting. However, the
    skills of being good team members and leaders cannot be practiced, if they aren't
    understood and evaluated.
    ? Not being clear on who's going to do what by when.
    Often team members do not specify agreement on the next steps and who's going to do
    them. Team members believe some one else is going to take the initiative only to find out
    at the next meeting that little or nothing was accomplished.
    ? Trying to be a facilitator and a content person at the same time.
    Being an excellent process facilitator takes a different set of skills from being a
    contributing team ...

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