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Team Work and Measure of Trust

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It is my belief that when teams are first formulated every individual approaches a new team with a measure of trust in each team member regardless of potential risks that have not yet surfaced. Based on my experience, I've worked with several teams in different intervals throughout the course of my profession, in which case I was compelled to have a modicum of trust which is most often defined as "blind faith in strangers," as a result of rapid increase of change in team members, thus resulting in restarting the team building cycle of forming, storming, norming, and performing (FSNP) over again. According to Dr. Bruce Tuckman (1965) the aforementioned team development model explains that as teams begin to evolve, grow, and mature in ability, leadership styles are also affected as a result of behavioral and organizational changes in patterns. The impact of interpersonal relationships in teams will depend upon whether the relationships are subjected to positivity or the opposite.

I find that trust that team members are going to have the same drive and determination to complete a tasks and exceed corporate expectations are automatically assumed instantaneously, however in some cases the assumption that all team members are on the same wavelength will consequently result in misinterpretation of instructions, miscommunication, and unresolved conflicts that will inevitably result in mistrust as time progresses. Paradoxically, it has been my assessment that when team members are getting to know one another, each member is suppose to critically dissect the teams strengths and areas of weakness and turn all forms of weaknesses into strengths. In theory, this assessment is the making of a somewhat perfect team; however, when functioning within diverse teams I've learned that there are some members who strive for excellence outside of the status quo, whereas other members contribute just enough to meet a quota or deadline. Consequently, both scenarios does not or will not automatically guarantee that trust will be rendered or easily accessible by the rest of the team, instead team members and team leaders will be apprehensive about new team members entering the group.

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It is my belief that when teams are first formulated every individual approaches a new team with a measure of trust in each team member regardless of potential risks that have not yet surfaced. Based on my experience, I've worked with several teams in different intervals throughout the course of my profession, in which case I was compelled to have a modicum of trust which is most often defined as "blind faith in strangers," as a result of rapid increase of change in team members, thus resulting in restarting the team building cycle of forming, storming, norming, and performing (FSNP) over again. According to Dr. Bruce Tuckman (1965) the aforementioned team development model explains that as teams begin to evolve, grow, and mature in ability, leadership styles are also affected as a result of behavioral and organizational changes in patterns. The impact of interpersonal relationships in teams will depend upon whether the relationships are subjected to positivity or the opposite.

I find that trust that team members are going to have the same drive and determination to complete a tasks and exceed corporate expectations are automatically assumed instantaneously, however in some cases the assumption that all team members are on the same wavelength will consequently result in misinterpretation of instructions, miscommunication, and unresolved conflicts that will inevitably result in mistrust as time progresses. Paradoxically, it has been my assessment that when team members are getting to know one another, each member is suppose to critically dissect the teams strengths and areas of ...

Solution Summary

It is my belief that when teams are first formulated every individual approaches a new team with a measure of trust in each team member regardless of potential risks that have not yet surfaced. Based on my experience, I've worked with several teams in different intervals throughout the course of my profession, in which case I was compelled to have a modicum of trust which is most often defined as "blind faith in strangers," as a result of rapid increase of change in team members, thus resulting in restarting the team building cycle of forming, storming, norming, and performing (FSNP) over again. According to Dr. Bruce Tuckman (1965) the aforementioned team development model explains that as teams begin to evolve, grow, and mature in ability, leadership styles are also affected as a result of behavioral and organizational changes in patterns. The impact of interpersonal relationships in teams will depend upon whether the relationships are subjected to positivity or the opposite.

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Human Resources Management: Ethics

I have a questions based on a scenario (which is down below) that need to be answered. I would appreciate if someone can assist me. Thank you!

Questions:

1. Describe the involvement of the vice-president's role with respect to the virtual team. Was the VP acting in an ethically responsible manner?

2. The VP is you mentor with respect to this and future virtual team projects. What is your ethical responsibility given what you know or strongly suspect?

3. With respect to the teams you will be creating, what ethically sound measures would you put in place to ensure each team member's contribution is fairly evaluated?

4. As trust is an essential component for proper group functioning and individual morale, what ethically appropriate measures would put in place to ensure a good level of trust among workers geographically separated?

Scenario:

You have been appointed as a Human Resources section manager in a large global corporation. The firm is an industry leader producing training and organization development guides. One of your major assignments will be to create a division devoted to managing virtual teams responsible for developing new training materials or updating existing ones. The time line extends 12 months into the future. The position involves monitoring an existing virtual team while being mentored by your manager, the vice president of HR. With a full understanding of the benefits of virtual teams enhanced by today's technology, you are aware of the need for trust among virtual team members. The virtual team you are monitoring is working on one of the firm's most sought after program guides.

The VP of HR appointed all the members of the team and one person to be the team leader. None of the team members knows the other team members and they, individually, only communicate with the team leader. The team leader only reports directly to the VP.

In following the team you come to realize that no team member knows what their teammates are contributing to the project. In fact, the team is functioning as a group with each member only working on a section of the project. The virtual team members are scattered across the country, many in different time zones.

Two months into your mandate, the virtual team's work is completed and it is a brilliant success. Five months into your mandate, the annual corporate awards banquet is scheduled. The virtual team leader, who lives close to the corporate offices, is in attendance. It becomes apparent she was the only member of the team invited to the banquet. Confirming you suspicions of the last few months, that the team leader was taking full credit for the team's output, she was singularly acknowledged for the work on the corporation's most popular program guide.

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