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    Defining The Public Leader (for Question 1)
    Leadership Theories (for Question 2)
    Leadership Styles (for Question 3)
    Explain in (4-5) pg :

    Determine two (2) leadership theories and two (2) leadership styles that support the definition of a public leader. Provide a rationale for your response.

    Assess the effectiveness of the two (2) leadership theories from Question 1. Provide two (2) examples for each leadership theory.

    Assess the effectiveness of the two (2) leadership styles from Question 1. Provide two (2) examples for each leadership style.

    Include at least four (4) peer-reviewed references (no more than five [5] years old) from material outside the textbook. Note: Appropriate peer-reviewed references include scholarly articles and governmental Websites. Wikipedia, other wikis, and any other websites ending in anything other than ".gov" do not qualify as academic resources.

    Evaluate the theories and models of public leadership.
    Differentiate among the styles of public leadership.
    Use technology and information resources to research issues in public leadership and conflict resolution.

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    SOLUTION This solution is FREE courtesy of BrainMass!

    Two leadership theories that support the definition of a public leader

    One of the leadership theories that support the definition of a public leader is transformational leadership theory. Public leadership involves taking action through a dynamic and transparent process. Consequently, a public leader is a person who works with others within an inclusive framework in order to realize legitimate, legal and socially valuable objectives. Transformational leadership theory assumes that a leader's portrayal enthusiasm and energy inspires action from followers (Yücel & Richard, 2013). Additionally, passionate leaders who have a vision inspire great achievements and people are drawn to a person who inspires them. Transformational leadership theory assumes that people are motivated when they know the importance of a task and that collective focus yields better results. Transformational leadership requires visibility of the leader, thus it supports the definition of a public leader which reiterates the elements of inclusiveness and taking action (Mesterova, Prochazka & Vaculik, 2014).

    The second leadership theory that supports the definition of a public leader is the path-goal leadership theory. This theory which falls under situational leadership focuses on encouraging and supporting followers to achieve set goals. A leader achieves this by clarifying the path that should be taken and removing obstacles that may hinder realization of the set goals. According to Von Krogh, Nonaka & Rechsteiner (2012), the achievement of objectives is a core part of public leadership. Consequently, the path-goal leadership theory supports the definition of public leadership because it involves inspiring people through participation, offering support, guidance and being achievement-oriented. Offering inspiration is an essential part of public leadership, and it enables public leaders to motivate those they lead to achieve great goals. In addition, public leaders must work with others and participation is one of the key pillars of the path-goal leadership theory.

    Two leadership styles that support the definition of a public leader

    Public leadership has more to do with the people one leads, and not the leader's personal needs. The definition of a public leader emphasizes the need to work with others, and the need for inclusiveness in the pursuit of goals that are meant to benefit society. One of the leadership styles that support the definition of a public leader is democratic leadership style because the elements of this style of leadership can enable a public leader to fulfill their mandate. This style of leadership reiterates the need to draw on people's knowledge and skills. Additionally, it is a style of leadership that cites creating group commitment as a core element of leadership. A public leader builds an inclusive framework, and this can only be achieved through consensus building which is an integral part of democratic leadership style (Von Krogh, Nonaka & Rechsteiner, 2012).

    Another style of leadership that supports the definition of a public leader is transformational leadership style. This style of leadership arises from the transformational leadership theory and it fully supports the ideals of public leadership. Mesterova, Prochazka & Vaculik (2014) assert that transformational leadership style calls for integrity, a high level of emotional intelligence, and the ability to motivate people to work towards achieving predetermined objectives. Additionally, the transformational leadership style requires leaders to take responsibility, and to inspire the people they lead. This style of leadership supports the definition of a public leader because the approach it calls for is in conformity with the qualities and approach that a public leader is required to have. It is a leadership style that calls on the leader to inspire action, which is a key element in the definition of a public leader (Mesterova, Prochazka & Vaculik, 2014).

    The effectiveness of transformational and path-goal leadership theories

    Transformational leadership theory is effective because leaders who apply this theory are required to explore new ways of doing things. Consequently, this leadership theory calls on leaders to always seek new opportunities and to demand efficiency from the people they lead. Yücel & Richard (2013) assert that transformational leadership theory calls for proactivity as opposed to reacting to situations. Leaders who apply this theory empower their followers and inspire them to achieve set objectives. Additionally, transformational leadership theory requires leaders to apply attributes of transactional leadership when the need arises. This leads to a high level of effectiveness because it allows leaders to change their approach depending on the situation (Yücel & Richard, 2013). An example of transformational leadership is where a public leader oversees adoption of new technology such as record automation. Another example is where a public leader rallies followers to implement preventive programs such as building a dam to prevent flooding.

    The path-goal leadership theory is effective because it calls for leaders to initiate structure. The theory focuses on avoiding confusion by clearly mapping out how the end results of the legitimate, legal and socially valuable objectives that have been decided upon are to be achieved. This attribute makes the leaders who apply the path-goal theory effective in their role because it helps to inspire followers to work towards set objectives. Additionally, a leader who applies the path-goal theory encourages and supports followers by showing proactivity in handling challenges (Silvia & McGuire, 2010). The path-goal theory reiterates the need for clarity when it comes to formulating goals, and determining how these goals will be achieved. This makes it an effective theory because the leader communicates specific expectations, and clarifies work function. Policies, rules and procedures are clearly articulated, and this helps to increase the degree of certainty (Silvia & McGuire, 2010).

    The effectiveness of democratic leadership style and transformational leadership style

    The democratic leadership style is effective because it fosters free sharing of ideas which makes members feel valued. According to Von Krogh, Nonaka & Rechsteiner (2012), this style of leadership is vital in dynamic situations where people have to keep up with the times. Since the democratic leadership style primarily relies on people's knowledge and skills, a leader has to facilitate conversation and encourage people to share their ideas. It is a style of leadership that enables a leader to receive diverse input from followers. However, it is important to note that the democratic leadership style can significantly hamper progress where contributions are so many that deciding a course of action takes too much time (Silvia & McGuire, 2010). An example of democratic leadership style is where a leader persuades legislators to pass a law as this requires dialogue between people with varied political persuasions.

    Transformational leadership style is effective because it allows the application of different capabilities, and leaders can use different approaches. Mesterova, Prochazka & Vaculik, (2014) assert that transformational leadership style creates distinct advantages due to its insistence on integrity and ability to motivate followers. These requirements make leaders who apply this style to focus on core attributes such as effective communication, service delivery and engagement with people in order to achieve set objectives (Yücel & Richard, 2013). Additionally, transformational leadership is effective because it focuses on empowering people, thus leaders who apply this style easily achieve great results. Empowering people makes attracts loyalty and encourages people to work harder. It makes it easier for a leader to introduce new initiatives, and attract support from followers to pursue these new initiatives (Mesterova, Prochazka & Vaculik 2014).

    References:

    Mesterova, J., Prochazka, J., & Vaculik, M. (2014). Relationship between self-efficacy, transformational leadership and leader effectiveness. Journal of Advanced Management Science, 3(2), 109-119.

    Silvia, C., & McGuire, M. (2010). Leading public sector networks: An empirical examination of integrative leadership behaviors. The Leadership Quarterly, 21(2), 264-277.

    Von Krogh, G., Nonaka, I., & Rechsteiner, L. (2012). Leadership in organizational knowledge creation: A review and framework. Journal of Management Studies, 49(1), 240-277,

    Yücel, İ., & Richard, O. C. (2013). Transformational leadership, subordinate experience, and subordinate organizational commitment: Different leadership strokes for different folks. Journal Review of Social, Economic and Administrative Studies, 27(1), 19-51.

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