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Behavior stereotypes; posted term papers; McDonald's obesity

1. A particular research study provides some evidence that those born between 1979 and 1994 are perceived as 'impatient, self-serving, disloyal, unable to delay gratification and, in short, feeling that they are entitled to everything without working for it'. The study dubs this group the 'entitlement generation'. Do you know people born during those years? Is this true generally or would you consider the perception instead a stereotype? From where do you think it stems?

2. Term papers on practically every subject imaginable are available on the Internet. Many of those who post the papers defend their practice in two ways: (1) These papers are posted to assist in research in the same way any other resource is posted on the Web and should simply be cited if used; and (2) these papers are posted in order to encourage faculty to modify paper topics and/or exams and not to simply bring back assignments that have been used countless times in the past. Are you persuaded? Is there anything unethical about this service in general? If so, who should be held accountable, the poster, the ultimate user, or someone else?

3. The Federal Trade Commission regulates advertising on the basis of two criteria: deception and unfairness. How can an ad be unfair? Who gets hurt by deceptive advertising?

4. Research the case Pelman v. McDonald's in which it was alleged that McDonald's was partially responsible for the health problems associated with the obesity of children who eat MacDonald's fast food. Should MacDonald's and other fast-food restaurants be judged negligent for selling dangerous products, failing to warn consumers of the dangers of a high-fat diet, and deceptive advertising?

Some websites to look at regarding the McDonald's obesity case:

U.S. judge dismisses obesity suit vs. McDonaldâ??s:
U.S. District Court Southern District of New York Opinion:
Food Fight: Obesity Raises Difficult Marketing Questions:

5. Investigate what is involved in an environmental audit. Has such an audit been conducted at your own present or former place of business, school, or university? In what ways has your present or former place of business, school, or university adopted sustainable practices? In what ways would your present or former place of business, school, or university need to change to become more sustainable?

You may reference the EPA's website, specifically the section dealing with Environmental Audits. The following links provide the EPA's audit policy and the protocol for conducting such audits:


Solution Preview

The age group known as the entitlement generation has most likely been given this label because it often appears that members are not expected to work for what they want. Parents, who are mostly of the baby boomer generation, are more affluent and have worked hard to give their children what they didn't have. While I believe some people in the entitlement generation accurately fit the label, there are many others who do not. Those whose parents have less means have had to get jobs in high school, work their way through college and in many ways, behave much like their parents did at a young age. It is also very typical of the older generation to label every new generation of young adults as 'no good,' 'lazy,' or worthless.

I am not persuaded that papers posted on the internet are there to encourage professors to change their course material or subject matter, when assigning written work. Much of the subject matter professors require students to master has relevance and meaning in today's society. In addition, students must often be required to master writing under broader headings, before they can refine their work and write within a narrower topic. While such papers can be useful in aiding research, they can also provide examples of how collegiate level papers should be formatted. However, the selling of such documents for a fee is not ethical. It may further encourage students not to do their own work or think for ...

Solution Summary

The behavior stereotypes for McDonald's obesity is examined.