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Ryan Door Co:Evaluating Employee Training Program

Reinventing the Wheel at Ryan Door Company

Jack Ryan, CEO of Ryan Doors, has a problem. No matter how often he tells his employees how to do their jobs, they invariably "decide to do it their way," as he puts it, and arguments ensure between Jack, the employee, and the employee's supervisor. One example is the door-design department, where the designers are expected to work with the architects to design doors that meet the specifications. While it is not "rocket science" as Jack puts it, the designers invariably make mistakes - such as designing in too much steel, a problem that can cost Ryan Doors tens of thousands of wasted dollars, once you consider the number of doors in a large office tower!

The current training process is as follows: None of the jobs has a training manual per se, although several have somewhat out-of-date job descriptions. The training for new employees is on-the-job. Usually, the employee leaving the company trains the new person during a one or two week overlap timeframe, but if there is no overlap, the new employee is trained as well as possible by other employees who have filled in occasionally on-the-job in the past.

Jack Ryan has decided to form a task force to help with the design and evaluation of a new training program for the design group. The task force is to submit recommendations based upon the following:

Explain in detail:

What should be done to improve the training process at Ryan Door.

Identify in detail:

a) The types of outcomes to use in evaluating the improved training process.

b) The evaluation design (justify the choice of design based on minimizing threats to validity and practical considerations.

Solution Preview

I hope ths helps!

To improve the training process at Ryan Door, it is crucial to start a formal process. Currently, the training is hit and miss. If an employee is around and knowledgeable then the new employee will be trained. However, even then the training changes based upon what one employee deems important or wishes to pass along. In other cases, a job description is utilized as the training manual. To improve training, the organization must determine the information that needs to be learned, best practices must be standardized, and training must be transferred in a manner that is engaging and effective.

Initially, the task force must determine the information that needs to be transferred to employees. It could do this by coming up with a list, but at the same time, it must take into account employee input. The case states that currently arguments ensue in regards to Jack Ryan's ideas and those of employees and their supervisors. This is unacceptable and a waste of time. Workers must be observed and the desired performance determined. Having a clear sense of Ryan Door's corporate mission and goals can help better define training outcomes. Once the task force determines what needs to be done, a program can be developed based upon best practices. Ultimately, the desired standards for work must be defined. This can be accomplished by identifying the desired performance. Metrics can be put in place to determine if the employee is accomplishing this level of performance. In the case of the designing doors, the percent of steel in the design may be a determining factor. Ryan cites that designing a door with too much steel "can cost Ryan Doors tens of thousands of wasted dollars, once you consider the number of doors in a large office tower". Obviously, this is not in the best interest of the workers either ...

Solution Summary

This detailed solution discusses how to improve the training process at Ryan Door, directly answering the following questions:

a) The types of outcomes to use in evaluating the improved training process.

b) The evaluation design (justify the choice of design based on minimizing threats to validity and practical considerations.
APA references are included.

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